List of Requests for Report Types in Quicken for Mac (297 Legacy Votes)

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  • Quicken SarahQuicken Sarah Administrator, Moderator ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018
    jacobs said:

    Steve, there were some very significant report upgrades in the 5.8 release just last month. The change from Quicken 2018 to 2019 is now just a marketing label -- the technology changes and improvements come as they are ready, not geared around the change of date on the label. 

    From the release notes for Quicken 5.8:

    • NEW - In 5.8, you'll now be able to customize a report with No Tag and No Payee as options.
    • NEW - Reports now have a Scale to Fit printing option so that wide reports can be shrunk to fit on a single page, saving paper.
    • IMPROVED - Comparison reports now print in color.
    • NEW - Full budgets can be printed based on the number of months you want to see on a page. You have the option of having 12, 6, 4, or 3 months per page.
    • NEW - Added an option to print a summary budget.
    • NEW - In 5.8, we added the ability to print, export, and copy the portfolio view without lots.
    • IMPROVED - The Price and Holdings As Of date is now added to both exported and printed versions of the portfolio view.
    • NEW - Added the Scale to Fit printing feature to the portfolio view so that everything fits on a single page.
    For me, the scale to fit changes are game-changers. I found the printed reports previously almost unusable, and although they still lack some functionality I'd like to see, they are considerably more usable. Same for being able to print my investment portfolio: it was hopeless (without exporting and cleaning up) when it printed every lot before, but it's now quite usable.

    Of course, there's still a long list of features, enhancements and usability tweaks users have asked for in reports, but I think it's incorrect to say there aren't any meaningful report upgrades.

    The next big move forward would be if they retire and replace the old reports (which came over from the old Quicken Essentials), and had all the reports use the "New Report" engine they've been incrementally enhancing over the past year. that would also signal that they have the core functionality in place, and should be able to more quickly add more report types that users have asked for.

    Frank, there's no great mystery here, although the situation is frustrating. They've been building the modern Quicken for Mac over the past 5 years. None of the code or core technologies in the old Quicken 2007 can be used in a modern Mac application, so they're needing to build things from scratch. In the first few years, they just used the limited reports from the older Quicken Essentials program from 2010. Last year, they began releasing in stages their work to create an all-new user interface and printing architecture for reports. It's advanced a lot, but still has a ways to go to match the functionality of Quicken 2007. Unfortunately, with a small development team, progress has been slower than either users or Quicken management had expected. For some of us longtime Quicken Mac users, this has been an annoyance, while for others, it has been a showstopper blocking a move off Quicken 2007. The good news, though, is that we can see by what they've released over the past year that they understand the shortcomings and are working to build out better reports.
    Moving to merge.


    Please reference the new conversation here: Moving to merge
  • Quicken SarahQuicken Sarah Administrator, Moderator ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018

    Jacobs, no snark intended, but if those are what you consider to be "significant report upgrades", I just don't know. Also you and I have had the discussion about what a commodity report writers are. It's not "rocket surgery". So here we are once again, still disappointed at the lack of meaningful progress.

    Moving to merge


    Please reference the new conversation here: Moving to merge
  • Quicken SarahQuicken Sarah Administrator, Moderator ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018
    jacobs said:

    Steve/QuickenSince92, I agree it is frustrating not knowing what new features are coming when. But there are two factors working against them doing that:

    (1) They do have competitors, and they don't want to tell the competition what they're working on months in advance. (I was just looking at the website of one of those competitors today, in response to a different post on this forum, and I thought it was interesting that a number of features in the brand new release of the competing product are things which quicken Mac has added over the last 12-18 months.) As users, we'd love to know what they're working on, but being in a competitive environment, they simply can't signal what's coming and allow the competition to match them or beat them to market.

     (2) They often don't know when particular features will come out, because the amount of work needed to implement some features often can't be projected accurately until the project is well along. Sometimes there are inter-dependencies which turn out to make development more complex than originally expected. Additionally, even once new features are completed, internal testing and beta testing may turn up bugs which can be easy or complex to track down and fix. Or beta testing may send certain work back into the lab to make changes base don tester feedback. If they announced a certain feature was planned for December, and it turned out to take longer to finish, or clear testing, then users would get mad at Quicken for failing to deliver what they said was coming.

    Moving to merge.


    Please reference the new conversation here: Moving to merge
  • Quicken SarahQuicken Sarah Administrator, Moderator ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018

    Jacobs. A lot of software development these days uses a methodology called Agile or a related style of approach that has "sprints" of short coding - unit testing so that new features can be evaluating and adjusted in short order. This approach also allows for better estimates on when (and if) features can be delivered. When you couple this with feature requests driven by market and user feedback any good development group can make fairly accurate estimates. The old style of writing a spec and then coding every last detail before beta and GA is long gone. I'm not saying Quicken uses an Agile style approach, but I'd be surprised if they don't use it or something similar. It also helps greatly reduce required timeframes and surprises that send development into overtime.

    Let's not go down this road anymore. No one knows what they're going to do or when (other than Quicken). I'm just one very disappointed Quicken user whose been waiting over a year for better reports and not happy with the progress.


     

    Moving to merge.


    Please reference the new conversation here: Moving to merge
  • Quicken SarahQuicken Sarah Administrator, Moderator ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018

    Agreed that many are frustrated with the slower than expected progress. There is no arguing that. 

    That said, this thread is not for this discussion. So, I am asking the moderators to move this into the other thread, where it can continue as desired.

    Moving to merge


    Please reference the new conversation here: Moving to merge
  • Quicken SarahQuicken Sarah Administrator, Moderator ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018

    Well it looks like all of our voting has gone for naught. I don't see any meaningful report upgrades in QM 2019.

    Moving to merge


    Please reference the new conversation here: Moving to merge
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