Add Reconciliation Report to Quicken for Mac (88 Legacy Votes)

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Comments

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    MichelleH said:
    So many people have requested this, I don't understand why the developers aren't putting this as a priority.
    I agree that many people have requested this. But the issue is simply that many people have requested many, many features. ;)

    What's your top priority may not be the same as other Quicken users, and the developers are constantly evaluating which changes and enhancements they think will help the most people. They haven't gotten to this request yet, but that doesn't mean they won't.
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Chris27
    Chris27 Member ✭✭✭
    I am not exactly sure "people have requested many, many features" on what those are, and it would be interesting to see the primary data source. Nevertheless, the subj report is basic. The non-customizable start screen is another one. The devs need to take some time off from the whackamole financial downloads and get back to basics. The cost of this software now is at a point where it needs to be at par with similar features of other financial apps. Curious to see the questions that gets ask in an upcoming survey!
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Chris27 said:
    I am not exactly sure "people have requested many, many features" on what those are, and it would be interesting to see the primary data source.
    Well, they have multiple data sources, but the one that's public which we can all see is the Product Idea posts on this community forum. A month or two back, I a did a quick scroll through the roughly dozen Idea sub-categories for Quicken Mac, there were about 600 enhancement requests proposed by users. (Some of those idea posts actually represent multiple feature requests.) More than 50 are marked "Under Consideration", meaning they got enough votes for the site moderators to advance the ideas to the product development and management teams. More than a dozen are marked as "Planned", which signifies that they have not only agreed with the idea and agree to implement it, but slotted it somewhere on their development roadmap.

    And as I said, that's not a comprehensive list of things they are or will be or might be working on. The developers get ideas from the Quicken Support team based on their interactions with customers, from other social media like Facebook forums, from other people within Quicken who have ideas about making the program better, from things competitors may put out, from features developed in Quicken Windows or their new Simplifi product, etc. Additionally, Infrastructure issues -- changes for evolving bank security protocols, changes to keep up with each new operating system, changes to keep up with hardware developments like the M1 Macs, etc. -- don't show up on the idea lists, but are of course necessary and sometimes time-consuming projects just to keep Quicken operating in a changing world. 

    Chris27 said:
    Nevertheless, the subj report is basic. The non-customizable start screen is another one. The devs need to take some time off from the whackamole financial downloads and get back to basics. 
    Your statement exemplifies my point exactly. First, the "whackamole financial downloads" are, most likely, the single most important feature across users of Quicken. The fact that it's an ever-changing, ever-shifting mess, and that download and connectivity problems constitute the largest number of posts here, and, I'd guess, the largest number of support calls they get, make is pretty apparent that they need to work on improvements to the infrastructure. In the current case, their service provider, Intuit, is replacing one of their connectivity systems with a newer one which should work better with the ongoing changes they encounter from financial institutions; as such, implementing that change requires code changes across all of Quicken's product lines. And if they get it right, when they're done, users won't see a single new feature, but will hopefully just encounter fewer connectivity problems over time. No, they can't ignore the single biggest weakness of Quicken; they need to invest time in it. (And I write that as someone who mostly enters his transactions manually and doesn't even depend on connectivity to my financial institutions.)

    Beyond that issue, though, you say the two features you have identified are "basic". If I had the time to hunt through hundreds of posts on this site, I'd be able to point you to dozens and dozens of other features which fellow users say are "basic", "obvious", "simple", etc.  Ask people who hold shares of a company which has split off or acquired another how "basic" the omission of an investment divestiture/acquisition feature is. Ask people who have vision issues how "basic" support of Dark Mode is. Ask people who use Quicken to minter their investments how "basic" the absence of investment reports is. Ask people who budget how "basic" the absence of a viable year-to-date actual-versus-budget report is. Ask people who have tried to convert from Quicken Windows to Mac but can't get their because one type of investment transaction in Quicken Windows doesn't get imported correctly how "basic" a need that is. I could go on, but you get the idea... there are lots of good, important and, yes, basic, ideas awaiting action. 

    I don't disagree agree with the request for the developers to create a reconciliation report, but for me personally, I never used a reconciliation report in three decades of using Quicken, and have no need for one now. 

    I don't disagree agree with the request for the developers to create a customizable home screen, but for me personally, I never use the home screen unless I click on it by accident. (Perhaps if it were vastly different, I might find it useful.)

    My point is that those two issues wouldn't rank in the Top 10 of my wishlist for Quicken. If you ask 100 Quicken Mac users to name their top 1 or 3 or 10 feature requests, you'll get very different answers. We all use Quicken differently, so it's not surprising. And thus the problem that there are many idea requests, and many good ones which would benefit many people among them, but the Quicken Mac development team, for a variety of reasons, just can't tackle many issues very quickly. And thus we all await each new release with eagerness, and are often disappointed when our top issues aren't among the ones addressed this time.

    After that somewhat depressing analysis, I'd like to end on a positive note. ;) The reason I'm still bullish on Quicken Mac is because I look back at where the program was when the new generation program appeared as Quicken 2015, or even three years ago, and I can see that there is indeed lots of progress which has been made. Lots of new features and improved features make the program much more capable than it was 3 or 6 years ago. To be sure, there's still a lot to do, but over time, the developers are chipping away at the feature requests we users throw at them. I'm pretty sure three years from now, there will still be features we'll be lamenting which haven't been implemented -- but there will also be a lot of things which have been addressed over those three years. 


    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Chris27
    Chris27 Member ✭✭✭
    Thanks for your comments. Bit depressing if social media is driving some of the devs ideas! Switched to Mac about five years ago. Most underwhelming program is Quicken. I cannot even get a Net Worth Report to center on a page! Yet, I still pay the same as the windows version. Thanks again, I do sincerely appreciate your insights and time.
  • tvcQuicken
    tvcQuicken Member
    > @jacobs said:
    > Carolyn, one thing to understand about the new-generation of Quicken for Mac is that some features from the past don’t exist simply because they haven’t gotten around to coding them yet. The developers had to start over from scratch, and they have a long list of feature requests from users as they work through re-developing 20+ years of work on the old Quicken. It’s taking a lot longer than they expected, and a lot longer than many users want. The only good thing is that they are making progress, and there are new features every couple months.
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    > That said, in some cases they have tried to re-think the way things should work — in some cases making improvements over the old versions, and in other cases making things worse.
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    > I’m not quite sure if the reconciliation report falls into the category of “just not done yet” or “we don’t think this is needed.” So it’s good for users to post here about features they want, because the developers sometimes don’t understand how people use the software.
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    > In that vein, I’d be interested to learn why a reconciliation report is important to you. I reconcile my accounts every month, but have never generated a report when I do so; I just check things off in the reconcile window. So I’m interested in understanding what a reconcile report does to help you reconcile your accounts.

    It's good business to have a reconciliation report. Even for your personal bookkeeping. While it doesn't happen often, I have had transactions "go missing" probably because of an accidental deletion, and when that happens, it is a real pain in the neck to have to go back and "re-reconcile" months of activity.
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    It's good business to have a reconciliation report. Even for your personal bookkeeping. While it doesn't happen often, I have had transactions "go missing" probably because of an accidental deletion, and when that happens, it is a real pain in the neck to have to go back and "re-reconcile" months of activity.
    that's exactly why the developers added the Reconciliation History feature. I don't know if you've tried it, but in a test file, I tried things like deleting a past transaction, changing the amount of a past transaction, changing the reconciled state of a past transaction -- and in all cases, the Reconciliation History screen showed me not only which reconciliation was now changed, but showed me the actual transaction(s) which changed, and allowed me to revert to the original state -- such as arresting an accidentally-delated transaction. -- with a single button click. It seems pretty slick to me. It seems it was clearly designed with the assumption that people don't have printed records of their reconciliation history but need to easily identify what changed in the past.  

    This not an argument against there being a way to print a reconciliation report; it's a feature I think they should add even though I don't personally have a need for it. I just think many Quicken users may not be aware of the excellent Reconciliation History feature and how it protects you from changes to previously-reconciled transactions. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993