Quicken works for me on mapped drives and the Cloud

Comments

  • SherlockSherlock SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018
    lf you haven't already, you may want to review: https://www.quicken.com/support/can-i-install-quicken-multiple-computers
    Quicken user since 1997 
    Premier on Windows 7 
  • Mick SimpsonMick Simpson Member
    edited October 2018

    I recently encountered problems with Quicken Deluxe 2017
    recognizing mapped drives. Long story short – the problem is resolved.  But I did see a lot of posts about how
    Quicken does not work with mapped drives or the Cloud. That piqued my interest
    because I've been using mapped drives for my Quicken data for close to 30 years
    without any data loss or corruption. 

    As I’ve been an independent consultant in the IT/Telephony/Cloud
    field for most of my career, I maintained home networks, servers, RAID arrays
    and more to ensure I had the knowledge to advise my clients. As a practice I
    NEVER keep data on my computer (desktop/laptop/tablet). I've used my servers (Novell,
    Windows), external drives, and/or RAID arrays for all my data. I've long since discontinued
    the use of servers and now all my data is either on my NAS RAID array, the
    Cloud, or mirrored to both. I am rapidly moving more of my data to the Cloud
    and see my use of on site RAID near the end of its life cycle on or before the
    end of 2019.

    That data migration now includes Quicken as of February 23, 2018.

    Today I tested Quicken with Microsoft OneDrive and had partial
    success as follows. 



    FIRST TEST: Quicken data file was placed in a
    OneDrive folder named Financial\Quicken with no local file synchronization.
    Quicken opens the file but only if you right click the file, select
    "download" and then "open" in the dialogs. Windows buries
    the file deep within the Users\AppData\Roaming\.... folder. This approach is
    not a viable Cloud solution. 



    SECOND TEST: I used the same folder/file but set the
    OneDrive option to synchronize the folders/files with the local OneDrive
    replica on my system. The results were perfect as I reliably created new
    transactions normally. Additional testing to follow with more complex
    transactions, reports, etc...



    THIRD TEST: I moved the same Financial\Quicken
    folders and files to a shared OneDrive folder. Two users and systems were included
    in this test. Both user OneDrive account options were set to synchronize the
    Financial\Quicken folders and files to the local OneDrive replica. Again, 100%
    successful as both users could reliably open the data file, enter or edit
    transactions. This test also maintained the ability to prevent multiple users
    from opening the file at the same time. User 2 was given an error message that
    another user had the file open. All transactions made by the 2 users
    were saved properly, replicated and viewed by the other users, as part of file
    locking/replication processes.



    OBSERVATIONS / OPINIONS: 

    Advantages include 1) instant, offsite backup of
    the data, 2) reliable shared access, 3) ability to use Quicken when away from
    an external hardware solution requiring a mapped drive or external drive. 4)
    ability to work on Quicken anywhere in the world where Internet access is
    available for synchronization. Can still use Quicken without Cloud
    synchronization as data will synch at next Internet session. 



    Disadvantages: 1) continued reliance on local
    data, e.g. OneDrive replica.



    OPINION: Quicken should develop the ability to directly
    use data files stored on the Cloud. If they do not, the world will pass them by
    and leave them in the dust heap occupied by Lotus 123, Ashton Tate, and many
    others.

    I don't understand why so many people are having data loss and file corruption issues.
  • Mick SimpsonMick Simpson Member
    edited February 2018
    Sherlock said:

    lf you haven't already, you may want to review: https://www.quicken.com/support/can-i-install-quicken-multiple-computers

    I am in compliance with the licensing limitations on the use of multiple systems and 1 Quicken purchase (license). As per the license agreement I can install on up to 3 systems; I have two.
  • PutterFluttersPutterFlutters Member ✭✭
    edited December 2018
    Old ways die hard....:-)
  • SherlockSherlock SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2018

    I recently encountered problems with Quicken Deluxe 2017
    recognizing mapped drives. Long story short – the problem is resolved.  But I did see a lot of posts about how
    Quicken does not work with mapped drives or the Cloud. That piqued my interest
    because I've been using mapped drives for my Quicken data for close to 30 years
    without any data loss or corruption. 

    As I’ve been an independent consultant in the IT/Telephony/Cloud
    field for most of my career, I maintained home networks, servers, RAID arrays
    and more to ensure I had the knowledge to advise my clients. As a practice I
    NEVER keep data on my computer (desktop/laptop/tablet). I've used my servers (Novell,
    Windows), external drives, and/or RAID arrays for all my data. I've long since discontinued
    the use of servers and now all my data is either on my NAS RAID array, the
    Cloud, or mirrored to both. I am rapidly moving more of my data to the Cloud
    and see my use of on site RAID near the end of its life cycle on or before the
    end of 2019.

    That data migration now includes Quicken as of February 23, 2018.

    Today I tested Quicken with Microsoft OneDrive and had partial
    success as follows. 



    FIRST TEST: Quicken data file was placed in a
    OneDrive folder named Financial\Quicken with no local file synchronization.
    Quicken opens the file but only if you right click the file, select
    "download" and then "open" in the dialogs. Windows buries
    the file deep within the Users\AppData\Roaming\.... folder. This approach is
    not a viable Cloud solution. 



    SECOND TEST: I used the same folder/file but set the
    OneDrive option to synchronize the folders/files with the local OneDrive
    replica on my system. The results were perfect as I reliably created new
    transactions normally. Additional testing to follow with more complex
    transactions, reports, etc...



    THIRD TEST: I moved the same Financial\Quicken
    folders and files to a shared OneDrive folder. Two users and systems were included
    in this test. Both user OneDrive account options were set to synchronize the
    Financial\Quicken folders and files to the local OneDrive replica. Again, 100%
    successful as both users could reliably open the data file, enter or edit
    transactions. This test also maintained the ability to prevent multiple users
    from opening the file at the same time. User 2 was given an error message that
    another user had the file open. All transactions made by the 2 users
    were saved properly, replicated and viewed by the other users, as part of file
    locking/replication processes.



    OBSERVATIONS / OPINIONS: 

    Advantages include 1) instant, offsite backup of
    the data, 2) reliable shared access, 3) ability to use Quicken when away from
    an external hardware solution requiring a mapped drive or external drive. 4)
    ability to work on Quicken anywhere in the world where Internet access is
    available for synchronization. Can still use Quicken without Cloud
    synchronization as data will synch at next Internet session. 



    Disadvantages: 1) continued reliance on local
    data, e.g. OneDrive replica.



    OPINION: Quicken should develop the ability to directly
    use data files stored on the Cloud. If they do not, the world will pass them by
    and leave them in the dust heap occupied by Lotus 123, Ashton Tate, and many
    others.

    I don't understand why so many people are having data loss and file corruption issues.
    I don't understand why so many people are having data loss and file corruption issues.
    Quicken needs to insure there is only one process manipulating a data file and the correct data file image is preserved.  The locking mechanism used by Quicken only reliably prevents a second Quicken process on the same machine from concurrently manipulating the data file.

    When Quicken manipulates a data file on a mapped network drive, the locking mechanism is subverted and the risk of not preserving the correct data file image is also increased.  The nature of the corruption of the preserved data file image that may be introduced is such that the problem may not be immediately apparent or repairable.
    OPINION: Quicken should develop the ability to directly use data files stored on the Cloud.

    I disagree. If you wish to store and access a data file on the Cloud using a mapped network drive, there are scripts you can use to copy the data file to and from mapped network drives when you start and exit Quicken.  Some of these scripts attempt to provide some rudimentary locking to prevent unwittingly manipulating the data file from multiple machines.

    My preferred mode is to use a remote desktop to access Quicken.  I only need to maintain one Quicken installation and can access my Quicken data from any device.  
    Quicken user since 1997 
    Premier on Windows 7 
  • SherlockSherlock SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2018
    Sherlock said:

    lf you haven't already, you may want to review: https://www.quicken.com/support/can-i-install-quicken-multiple-computers

    Did you miss the sections on network storage and cloud drives?
    Quicken user since 1997 
    Premier on Windows 7 
  • Mick SimpsonMick Simpson Member
    edited July 2018

    I recently encountered problems with Quicken Deluxe 2017
    recognizing mapped drives. Long story short – the problem is resolved.  But I did see a lot of posts about how
    Quicken does not work with mapped drives or the Cloud. That piqued my interest
    because I've been using mapped drives for my Quicken data for close to 30 years
    without any data loss or corruption. 

    As I’ve been an independent consultant in the IT/Telephony/Cloud
    field for most of my career, I maintained home networks, servers, RAID arrays
    and more to ensure I had the knowledge to advise my clients. As a practice I
    NEVER keep data on my computer (desktop/laptop/tablet). I've used my servers (Novell,
    Windows), external drives, and/or RAID arrays for all my data. I've long since discontinued
    the use of servers and now all my data is either on my NAS RAID array, the
    Cloud, or mirrored to both. I am rapidly moving more of my data to the Cloud
    and see my use of on site RAID near the end of its life cycle on or before the
    end of 2019.

    That data migration now includes Quicken as of February 23, 2018.

    Today I tested Quicken with Microsoft OneDrive and had partial
    success as follows. 



    FIRST TEST: Quicken data file was placed in a
    OneDrive folder named Financial\Quicken with no local file synchronization.
    Quicken opens the file but only if you right click the file, select
    "download" and then "open" in the dialogs. Windows buries
    the file deep within the Users\AppData\Roaming\.... folder. This approach is
    not a viable Cloud solution. 



    SECOND TEST: I used the same folder/file but set the
    OneDrive option to synchronize the folders/files with the local OneDrive
    replica on my system. The results were perfect as I reliably created new
    transactions normally. Additional testing to follow with more complex
    transactions, reports, etc...



    THIRD TEST: I moved the same Financial\Quicken
    folders and files to a shared OneDrive folder. Two users and systems were included
    in this test. Both user OneDrive account options were set to synchronize the
    Financial\Quicken folders and files to the local OneDrive replica. Again, 100%
    successful as both users could reliably open the data file, enter or edit
    transactions. This test also maintained the ability to prevent multiple users
    from opening the file at the same time. User 2 was given an error message that
    another user had the file open. All transactions made by the 2 users
    were saved properly, replicated and viewed by the other users, as part of file
    locking/replication processes.



    OBSERVATIONS / OPINIONS: 

    Advantages include 1) instant, offsite backup of
    the data, 2) reliable shared access, 3) ability to use Quicken when away from
    an external hardware solution requiring a mapped drive or external drive. 4)
    ability to work on Quicken anywhere in the world where Internet access is
    available for synchronization. Can still use Quicken without Cloud
    synchronization as data will synch at next Internet session. 



    Disadvantages: 1) continued reliance on local
    data, e.g. OneDrive replica.



    OPINION: Quicken should develop the ability to directly
    use data files stored on the Cloud. If they do not, the world will pass them by
    and leave them in the dust heap occupied by Lotus 123, Ashton Tate, and many
    others.

    I don't understand why so many people are having data loss and file corruption issues.
    Been doing this for almost 30 years without a problem Sherlock. Also, I got a file in use error when I tried to get more than 1 user in the file that I was testing on OneDrive. 

    This is not an operation where there is a group of folks using the file, there are two of us. We're not pounding away at the keyboards. Microsoft OneDrive is working well for us now with synchronization between the local systems and OneDrive. I would bet that most Quicken users are similar in that there are 1 - 2 or 3 users at most. Small businesses use something like QuickBooks.

    I fully understand your point about file locking. While it has been a number of years, I used to write network enabled applications to support 1 - N simultaneous users. I wrote my own file and record locking as well as commit and journaling functions to protect my application's data. I get networks and multi-user scenarios.

    With regard to Quicken and cloud support, I firmly believe that the ability to use the Cloud directly is a must have. Look around at all of the major apps that support and/or function with the cloud, either as hybrid system/cloud solutions or more flexible solutions.  Some such as Microsoft Office 365 function with locally installed applications or browser based applications all using cloud data. Adobe also has gone the way of the cloud with others following suit. Many vendors are also pushing their own cloud solutions with their apps.

    Quicken doesn't necessarily need to develop it's own cloud, but partner with an established cloud service provider to develop operational support. Rackspace, AWS, Verizon Terradata, Microsoft (Azure or OneDrive), Apple, just to name a few.  The technology sector is littered with firms that thought they were perfect the way they were but time ran out on them as customers left for better solutions. 
  • Mick SimpsonMick Simpson Member
    edited February 2018
    Sherlock said:

    lf you haven't already, you may want to review: https://www.quicken.com/support/can-i-install-quicken-multiple-computers

    Nope. See my comments below.
  • Mick SimpsonMick Simpson Member
    edited December 2018
    They do indeed PutterFlutters. I may be old and retired, but still look for better ways to do things.
  • Mick SimpsonMick Simpson Member
    edited February 2018

    I recently encountered problems with Quicken Deluxe 2017
    recognizing mapped drives. Long story short – the problem is resolved.  But I did see a lot of posts about how
    Quicken does not work with mapped drives or the Cloud. That piqued my interest
    because I've been using mapped drives for my Quicken data for close to 30 years
    without any data loss or corruption. 

    As I’ve been an independent consultant in the IT/Telephony/Cloud
    field for most of my career, I maintained home networks, servers, RAID arrays
    and more to ensure I had the knowledge to advise my clients. As a practice I
    NEVER keep data on my computer (desktop/laptop/tablet). I've used my servers (Novell,
    Windows), external drives, and/or RAID arrays for all my data. I've long since discontinued
    the use of servers and now all my data is either on my NAS RAID array, the
    Cloud, or mirrored to both. I am rapidly moving more of my data to the Cloud
    and see my use of on site RAID near the end of its life cycle on or before the
    end of 2019.

    That data migration now includes Quicken as of February 23, 2018.

    Today I tested Quicken with Microsoft OneDrive and had partial
    success as follows. 



    FIRST TEST: Quicken data file was placed in a
    OneDrive folder named Financial\Quicken with no local file synchronization.
    Quicken opens the file but only if you right click the file, select
    "download" and then "open" in the dialogs. Windows buries
    the file deep within the Users\AppData\Roaming\.... folder. This approach is
    not a viable Cloud solution. 



    SECOND TEST: I used the same folder/file but set the
    OneDrive option to synchronize the folders/files with the local OneDrive
    replica on my system. The results were perfect as I reliably created new
    transactions normally. Additional testing to follow with more complex
    transactions, reports, etc...



    THIRD TEST: I moved the same Financial\Quicken
    folders and files to a shared OneDrive folder. Two users and systems were included
    in this test. Both user OneDrive account options were set to synchronize the
    Financial\Quicken folders and files to the local OneDrive replica. Again, 100%
    successful as both users could reliably open the data file, enter or edit
    transactions. This test also maintained the ability to prevent multiple users
    from opening the file at the same time. User 2 was given an error message that
    another user had the file open. All transactions made by the 2 users
    were saved properly, replicated and viewed by the other users, as part of file
    locking/replication processes.



    OBSERVATIONS / OPINIONS: 

    Advantages include 1) instant, offsite backup of
    the data, 2) reliable shared access, 3) ability to use Quicken when away from
    an external hardware solution requiring a mapped drive or external drive. 4)
    ability to work on Quicken anywhere in the world where Internet access is
    available for synchronization. Can still use Quicken without Cloud
    synchronization as data will synch at next Internet session. 



    Disadvantages: 1) continued reliance on local
    data, e.g. OneDrive replica.



    OPINION: Quicken should develop the ability to directly
    use data files stored on the Cloud. If they do not, the world will pass them by
    and leave them in the dust heap occupied by Lotus 123, Ashton Tate, and many
    others.

    I don't understand why so many people are having data loss and file corruption issues.
    Qualifications to my use of Mapped drive, Cloud solution as I have described:
    1) To be precise, the file locking I mentioned above goes to the Quicken warning regarding simultaneous users. See Sherlock's comments above and understand that you cannot successfully get multiple simultaneous users banging away at a Quicken file. I would say that Quicken's view of my solution is that I proceed at my own risk.
    2) I have a Microsoft Surface Pro 4 and my wife uses a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. The Microsoft Surface Pro 4 is my main system and the system that I travel with. As a result the OneDrive Quicken replica is always with me on the Surface Pro 4. Connected to the Internet I always get the immediate synchronization. When not connected the data synchronization occurs the next time I connect to the Internet. This  works for us because we can both see and update our data from OneDrive. 
    3) My tests are only with Microsoft OneDrive for what I do. I have Dropbox and other cloud solutions available to me, but find that OneDrive is working well for me.
    4) I run daily data backups. A full backup followed by 3 differential backups. I retain 3 full backup cycles. I review my backup logs and backup drive every day for errors.  
  • PutterFluttersPutterFlutters Member ✭✭
    edited February 2018

    They do indeed PutterFlutters. I may be old and retired, but still look for better ways to do things.

    I've been successfully using various setups for Quicken file storage for longer than I can remember (that's not a long as it used to be :-).  Currently using "Backup and Sync from Google" formerly known at Google drive.  I am going to jinx myself an say I never had a problem that I didn't create.

    I have just chalked the success up to the fact that my data files are local.  As far as I can tell, both Google Backup and sync and OneDrive are just trying to keep my local info backed (synced) up to "THE CLOUD".

    As changes are made to the Quicken data file the process of committing those changes to both the local and cloud systems seems to slow down.  I am again just assuming that some type of record locking fighting it out to control the "who's next" as far as reading and writing to that file.

    Bottom line it has been working for a LONG time and I have backups of my backups.
  • KayoKayo Member ✭✭
    edited June 2018
    Wow, a real pro doing real work.  This discussion raises my opinion Quicken 2017's current state of affairs considerably.
  • Quicken_TykaQuicken_Tyka Moderator ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 2018
    Hey all,

    I have included an FAQ regarding file sharing https://www.quicken.com/support/can-i-share-my-quicken-file-between-multiple-computers-using-dropbox.  This does specify dropbox but this also includes the cloud, one drive etc.

    Glad to hear that this working out.  I would also like to add to this thread that this procedure isn't recommend and isn't official supported.

    Thanks!
    -Quicken Tyka
This discussion has been closed.