IDEA to support Thrift Savings Plan

I understand that it is on the TSP to work with Quicken, but that still leaves numerous Quicken users caught in the middle.  I've been using Quicken since 1993 and would like support for this idea.  My idea would be a tweak to the Portfolio Update Price process that could be done by Quicken to help make the manual updates easier.  Add a screen for TSP that lets us put in a single date, and then the prices for the funds as shown on https://www.tsp.gov/InvestmentFunds/FundPerformance/index.html.  In other words, it would be a simpler process to type just the 10 fund prices rather than choose the fund, click the update, pick the date, enter the price, and repeat 10 times.  Even better would be the ability to copy/paste from the TSP website into your input screen, which I can do into Excel, and each price enters a separate cell.  Just imagine the joy for hundreds-of-thousands of federal and military servants to be able to do a simple copy/paste and the fund prices would be current!  Thank you for your consideration of this idea.
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  • mshigginsmshiggins SuperUser
    edited July 2018
    From C. D. Bales:



    I question whether Quicken should expend any of their limited resources for this; especially when you consider that TSP does not appear to be expending any of their resources - even the very limited resources needed to supply a Quicken compatible file of their prices (see below). It would also create an unwanted precedent for Quicken.



    [I'm extremely skeptical that there are anywhere near hundreds of thousands of Quicken users who are using TSP. Have you evidence to support that?]



    Quicken can import security prices from a properly formatted .CSV file.



    If seems to me you could implement much of your idea using Excel. Pre-fill the appropriate Excel rows/columns, modify the variable field(s) as needed for each price update, then have Excel save the data as a .CSV file.



    The instructions and the format are in Quicken Help; a copy of which follows.



    _ In the Investing tab, choose the Portfolio view.



    _ Choose File menu > File Import > Import security prices from CSV file.



    _ In the File field, enter the name of the ASCII file that contains the price data. The data must be in an acceptable CSV format.



    _ In Date field, change the date information if necessary.



    _ Click OK.



    __ About using the CSV format for security prices The data must be in standard ASCII format with one symbol/price/date per line, separated by either commas or double spaces (using only one type of separator per line).



    These import formats are all acceptable. Note that Quicken can handle quotation marks:



    ABC, 123.456



    ABC, 123.456, 12/31/02



    ABC 123.456 12/31/02



    ABC, "ABC", 123.456, "12/31/02"



    "ABC", "123.456", "12/31



    __ Tell me more


    If the file doesn't contain specified dates, import the prices to the date entered here. The currently selected date in Portfolio is the preset display in this field.



    Quicken matches prices with your securities if they have the same symbol. If your securities don't have symbols, you'll need to edit them first so they do.
    Quicken user since Q1999. Currently using QW2017.
    Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list
  • Alan BergAlan Berg Member
    edited October 2018
    I can't say how many TSP users are using Quicken, but from the TSP Financial Report:  "As of December 31, 2016, there  were approximately 5.0 million participants in the Plan" and the TSP has approximately $500 Billion in assets. 

    My point is that TSP and Quicken have both ignored the demand for a simpler way to track these investments.  I don't know about Quicken's "limited resources" but they're the one I've been paying for 25 years for their software and they speak of customer satisfaction.  This remains my suggestion along with that of others (Google "Quicken TSP" and there are 725,000 matches!)
  • J_MikeJ_Mike SuperUser
    edited October 2018
    OP wrote; Add a screen for TSP that lets us put in a single date, and then the prices for the funds............
    If I understand your request, you can do exactly as described in a QWin Portfolio View.
    Set up a view with your account holdings and include the "Quote/Price" column in the view - plus any other desired data columns.
    You can set the Date for the view.
    You can enter price info in the Quote/Price column of the Portfolio View - either keyboard entry or copy/paste from an outside source.

    I do this routinely for a retirement account that holds institutional funds and that does not provide downloading capability. I Copy closing price info  from the FI's website and Paste into the portfolio view. I do not have to go to the price history file for each individual security. Using a portfolio view is quick and easy for manual input.
    QWin & QMac (Deluxe) Subscription User
  • Alan BergAlan Berg Member
    edited October 2018
    Thanks -- I wasn't aware that the Portfolio View allowed direct entry!  Much appreciated.
  • J_MikeJ_Mike SuperUser
    edited August 2018
    Alan Berg said:

    Thanks -- I wasn't aware that the Portfolio View allowed direct entry!  Much appreciated.

    Yes, a very handy feature in QWin.
    I also run QMac and it does not have this feature. Manual update date of quotes is as you described above - go to each individual security, select price history and enter date and quote - a real pain.
    QWin & QMac (Deluxe) Subscription User
  • edited October 2018
    I seriously can't believe this issue is still being debated. The United States government is one of the, if not the largest employer in the country. I have been using Quicken for about 20 years now and I am finally done after years of manually updating the TSP. Not to mention my kids' state 401k plan of Vanguard investments, which is also not supported by Quicken. I can download TSP and 401k plan investments in Mint, Personal Captial, etc., etc., but Quicken still hasnt' figured it out. Time to break ties.
  • NotACPANotACPA SuperUser
    edited August 2018

    I seriously can't believe this issue is still being debated. The United States government is one of the, if not the largest employer in the country. I have been using Quicken for about 20 years now and I am finally done after years of manually updating the TSP. Not to mention my kids' state 401k plan of Vanguard investments, which is also not supported by Quicken. I can download TSP and 401k plan investments in Mint, Personal Captial, etc., etc., but Quicken still hasnt' figured it out. Time to break ties.

    When you say "not supported by Quicken", you've got it 100% bass-ackwards.

    It's the FI (the Vanguard Trustee and TSP) who need to decide to support Quicken.  Quicken can't force them to make the changes to THEIR SYSTEMS to make them work with Q.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor"
  • edited October 2018

    I seriously can't believe this issue is still being debated. The United States government is one of the, if not the largest employer in the country. I have been using Quicken for about 20 years now and I am finally done after years of manually updating the TSP. Not to mention my kids' state 401k plan of Vanguard investments, which is also not supported by Quicken. I can download TSP and 401k plan investments in Mint, Personal Captial, etc., etc., but Quicken still hasnt' figured it out. Time to break ties.

    Fair enough, but as the consumer, I shouldn't have to understand the technical details of how Quicken's systems interact with TSP or vice versa. It's irrelevant. The service doesn't meet my needs or the needs of any federal employee who invests in the TSP. It's irrelevant who's at fault. If Quicken can't make it happen, they will lose more customers like myself who are willing to cut ties after many years and move to products that do meet our needs.
  • splashersplasher SuperUser
    edited August 2018

    I seriously can't believe this issue is still being debated. The United States government is one of the, if not the largest employer in the country. I have been using Quicken for about 20 years now and I am finally done after years of manually updating the TSP. Not to mention my kids' state 401k plan of Vanguard investments, which is also not supported by Quicken. I can download TSP and 401k plan investments in Mint, Personal Captial, etc., etc., but Quicken still hasnt' figured it out. Time to break ties.

    It is simple, to be a Quicken participating FI, there is a fee involved.  TSP won't pay the fee, so no downloads of TSP information.  How is that Quicken's fault?
    -splasher  using Q since 1996 -  QW2016, 2017 & Subscription  -  Win7/Win10
    -Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list

  • Alan BergAlan Berg Member
    edited October 2018

    I seriously can't believe this issue is still being debated. The United States government is one of the, if not the largest employer in the country. I have been using Quicken for about 20 years now and I am finally done after years of manually updating the TSP. Not to mention my kids' state 401k plan of Vanguard investments, which is also not supported by Quicken. I can download TSP and 401k plan investments in Mint, Personal Captial, etc., etc., but Quicken still hasnt' figured it out. Time to break ties.

    It's Quicken's fault because they also charge us to use their software by purchase or subscription.  That's called double-dipping.
  • QPWQPW Member
    edited August 2018

    I seriously can't believe this issue is still being debated. The United States government is one of the, if not the largest employer in the country. I have been using Quicken for about 20 years now and I am finally done after years of manually updating the TSP. Not to mention my kids' state 401k plan of Vanguard investments, which is also not supported by Quicken. I can download TSP and 401k plan investments in Mint, Personal Captial, etc., etc., but Quicken still hasnt' figured it out. Time to break ties.

    Actually the way I understand how it works, it isn't even the hands of Quicken Inc.

    Quicken Inc pays Intuit for the service.  Intuit has always had it in their business plan to charge for the service.

    And yeah you can look at it as "double dipping", but it is also interesting to note that Microsoft didn't charged for this service, and MS Money has long since been shutdown.

    Personally all during my working days my 401K was never supported, and I entered it manually.  I never really found that to be much of a burden.
  • NotACPANotACPA SuperUser
    edited October 2018
    That's called double-dipping.
    How?  They're providing a service to you (the Q product) and a service to TSP (the ability to download transactions to the mutual customers).

    TSP doesn't want that service.  Your complaint is with them.

    AND, btw, we're other customers ... and can do NOTHING to implement your desire.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor"
  • Alan BergAlan Berg Member
    edited October 2018
    They won't support the consumer (us) who pay unless the TSP also pays -- that's double dipping. 
  • NotACPANotACPA SuperUser
    edited August 2018
    Alan Berg said:

    They won't support the consumer (us) who pay unless the TSP also pays -- that's double dipping. 

    No,  that's getting paid from each entity that benefits from a service.  Except that one of those entities doesn't want the service. so they don't pay for it.

    If TSP wanted the service, they'd pay for it.

    Your complaint is STILL with TSP, not Q.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor"
  • splashersplasher SuperUser
    edited August 2018
    Alan Berg said:

    They won't support the consumer (us) who pay unless the TSP also pays -- that's double dipping. 

    As pointed out by QPW, complain to Intuit, they are the one that charges Quicken for the service connection provided.
    -splasher  using Q since 1996 -  QW2016, 2017 & Subscription  -  Win7/Win10
    -Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list

  • carl wcarl w Member
    edited August 2018
    TSP is supported in both Mint and Personal capital. Quicken charges a considerable amount of money and cannot access TSP data, which two competitors can. That is ridiculous. The same goes for not being able to sync many IRAs at banks, which tells me that Quicken needs to hurry the hell up and catch up.
  • Will StewartWill Stewart Member
    edited October 2018

    Kelly is right - Since TSP has 5 million employees and is a government service (who would not be expected to pay fees), Quicken should provide at the very minimum for the importing of TSP .csv files. If Intuit needs to be involved, Quicken should make those arrangements, not pass the buck.  
  • splashersplasher SuperUser
    edited October 2018


    Kelly is right - Since TSP has 5 million employees and is a government service (who would not be expected to pay fees), Quicken should provide at the very minimum for the importing of TSP .csv files. If Intuit needs to be involved, Quicken should make those arrangements, not pass the buck.  

    So, you are suggesting that government employees should be given a free ride.  TSP needs to step up and consider the fee to be part of the cost of business seeing as how they are providing this "service" to their customers.  TSP pays their employees, don't they, they also pay their utility bills, a fee to Quicken/Intuit for being a participating financial institution only seems proper.  Before you start throwing rocks at me, I'm a fed retiree, so I've been on both sides of this fence, TSP needs to step up and treat their clients like customers of a real business, not a government entity.
    -splasher  using Q since 1996 -  QW2016, 2017 & Subscription  -  Win7/Win10
    -Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list

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