Using two Macs for the same account.

PatrickPatrick Member
edited December 2018 in Before you Buy
Essentially I am using an iMac and a Macbook, both running Mohave and using the latest version of Quicken 2019.  I want to use both machines to download transactions and reconcile.  Do I have to restore the latest backup each time I do this, or is their a way to sync the account with both machines?
«1

Comments

  • John_in_NCJohn_in_NC SuperUser
    edited December 2018
    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.
  • smayer97smayer97 SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    That is not entirely accurate. Though I do not recommend the following, as it uses common back-end syncing that has been troublesome for QMobile users and has caused data file corruption in some cases, for completeness, there is a very little known feature that supposedly can sync 2 desktop data files in QMac, if data files on two computers are connected to the same Quicken Cloud account.

    In QM2017 v4.6.8 was released a feature that says "Sync Asset Accounts between 2 Macs."

    Very rudimentary testing by one SU revealed the following:
    • "transactions in the accounts sync between the two computers. Not just asset accounts, but checking, etc.
    • This also works for QM2018 (but not for asset accounts, yet).
    • test of a 401k account, the account itself synced, but not the transactions within it."
    Unfortunately, there is a complete lack of documentation on this so YMMV and I would proceed with extreme caution if you try this.

    There are alternatives you can consider:
    • If you have mobile devices (iOS or Android) and if all you want to sync is cash, bank, and credit card accounts, consider using Quicken Mobile on a mobile device. You can sync more than one mobile to the same data file located on one of your computers, as long as you use the same Intuit ID associated to the data file. Note that this is limited to sync 24 months plus new transactions.
    • use remote access software (several free options, e.g. NoMachine and Teamviewer) to access Quicken on one computer from the other, or even mobile devices (see this great article for complete review of many options (most are free): http://machow2.com/rdp-for-mac/ ****). If both are Macs, the built-in Mac OS X screen-sharing may work for you too. The advantage of these solutions is that you retain access to all the features of Quicken, unlike Quicken Mobile. The trade-off is that the host computer cannot really be used for anything else while using Quicken with these remote solutions. 
    ****Though it is written with Macs in mind, many of the solutions work on Windows too. 

    (If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)

    If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.

    (STILL using QM2007, Canadian user since '92)

    Have Questions? Check out these FAQs:
  • PatrickPatrick Member
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Thanks all. I think I will go with remote access for now. I appreciate the timely and thoughtful advice!
  • jeffgejeffge Member
    edited December 2018
    I find it rather amazing that in a world where every other application I use can sync to the cloud, Quicken remains a local machine only application.  Can anyone explain what specific to Quicken makes this so?


  • edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    I also am using 2 Macs.  I have the latest version of QM2019 on both.  One Mac stays home and the other travels with me.  I moved to the Mac version from Win version 3 weeks ago and after that seemed ok, I used the move command to park the file in my dropbox.  That seemed fine so I double-clicked on the file in dropbox from the little Macbook Pro (the traveling one).  and all seems fine EXCEPT it's clear that the move command does not copy login info so whenever I switch from either Mac to the other, I must enter user and passwords again.  BUT accounts including items, balances, etc seem to match perfectly.  Now I am wondering if I copy some files that never moved or copied from the Library over to the dropbox location if that would fix that one issue.  As I am sure most have discovered, Moving only gives us the smaller file without the extras left over in the Library.  Other than that, the 2 macs are working fine with all items and accounts in this file.  If I could get the rest of the info brought into the mix, I'd be very happy.  Maybe backup and give this a try!
  • Connie BrownConnie Brown Member
    edited December 2018
    jeffge said:

    I find it rather amazing that in a world where every other application I use can sync to the cloud, Quicken remains a local machine only application.  Can anyone explain what specific to Quicken makes this so?


    The way Quicken was programmed through the decades. It will take clever and persistent decisions and work to design and incorporate Web functionality today's users expect.
  • Connie BrownConnie Brown Member
    edited December 2018
    jeffge said:

    I find it rather amazing that in a world where every other application I use can sync to the cloud, Quicken remains a local machine only application.  Can anyone explain what specific to Quicken makes this so?


    My husband (the true techie in the family) just noted that he likes the fact that Quicken's data in on your local computer, more in your control.
  • RickORickO SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Jim,

    Storing your actual file in Dropbox is not recommended. Without getting too deep into the technical details, it is possible for permissions errors to crop up deep within the Quicken file structure, corrupting the file and making it unusable. Some users have run this way for months or years, only to run into major problems down the road.

    So, if you want to keep your file in Dropbox, do so at your own risk. And make sure you have frequent backups on both ends so you can recover if disaster strikes.
  • PatrickPatrick Member
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Rick- Can you save the latest file in Finder and simply open that file on either machine?
  • PatrickPatrick Member
    edited December 2018
    jeffge said:

    I find it rather amazing that in a world where every other application I use can sync to the cloud, Quicken remains a local machine only application.  Can anyone explain what specific to Quicken makes this so?


    There is that...
  • PatrickPatrick Member
    edited December 2018
    jeffge said:

    I find it rather amazing that in a world where every other application I use can sync to the cloud, Quicken remains a local machine only application.  Can anyone explain what specific to Quicken makes this so?


    Amen to that!
  • edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    This currently works well for me and that file is fine on either Mac except for the login info. But this a much smaller file than the original WIN data file. So the backup filecannot be complete either. Next step for me to try would be a backup file on a flash drive but I’ll bet login data isn’t available there either.
  • RickORickO SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Patrick & Jim... the only truly safe way to move the file between machines is to save a backup (which is compressed), move that, then restore on the 2nd machine. Another option is to keep your file on one computer and remote into that computer from the 2nd one. In this case, Quicken is only running on the first machine where the file is located.

    Patrick, I'm not sure what you mean by "open that file on either machine", but if you mean store it in a Dropbox linked folder, then my advise above applies. You are taking chances of your data being corrupted.

    Here's the official Quicken position:

    https://www.quicken.com/support/can-i-share-my-quicken-file-between-multiple-computers-using-dropbox

    However, even if you take the precautions there, our SuperUser experience is that the file may still be corrupted due to the aforementioned permissions errors creeping in. So you take your chances.
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    I echo everything @RickO said, with one minor tweak...
    the only truly safe way to move the file between machines is to save a backup (which is compressed), move that,...
    The key there is compressed, not backup. So if you store your Quicken data file somewhere you can quickly access it, such as you Documents folder*, in the Finder you can make a compressed copy (File > Compress) which results in a .zip file. That .zip file is basically the same as a Quicken-generated backup file. Either of these compressed files are fine to move from machine to machine, un-compress, use on the other machine, compress again, and move back to the original machine.

    *Getting little far afield here, but since it's related: if you store your Quicken data file in your Documents folder or Desktop, it's very important to make sure your Mac is not configured to be storing those folders on iCloud (for the same reasons storing your data file on Dropbox is a no-no). If you're not familiar with this, open System Preferences, open iCloud, and if iCloud Drive is checked, click on Options next to iCloud Drive; then make sure the checkbox for Desktop & Documents Folders is unchecked, or uncheck it if it is.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • smayer97smayer97 SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    ...  backup (which is compressed),...
    (If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)

    If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.

    (STILL using QM2007, Canadian user since '92)

    Have Questions? Check out these FAQs:
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    @smayer97, I think you missed the point I was trying to make: a backup file is fine to move, because it is compressed, but if it’s easier to access your Quicken data file, then making a compressed copy in the Finder is equally good. The key to moving a data file is not that you must specifically move a backup file, but that you move a compressed file.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Confusion sets in on the 73 year-old. Are you suggesting that compressing that file which now is only 13 mb may include all the pieces from the Library and that logins will work on either Mac?
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Your Quicken data file is actually a “wrapper” around a number of different files, and it’s all you need. Any of the ancillary files Quicken creates in the user Library folder are re-created or re-downloaded on a different machine as needed. So yes, all you need is a copy of your data file — either manually compressed via the Finder command or a backup created from within Quicken — to move from one computer to another.


    There is one thing I’d make you aware of lest it trip you up. Normally, when you launch Quicken, it will open the last Quicken data file you used on that computer. If you’re moving data files from one computer to another, you can get messed up if you end up with multiple Quicken data files from your copying (e.g. “MyQuickenData” and “MyQuickenData copy” or “MyQuickenData(2)”). You want to make sure that either (a) your Quicken data file always has the same name after you move it or (b) you get in the habit of opening Quicken by dragging the data file you want to open over the Quicken icon in your Dock.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • RickORickO SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Jim... @jacobs is right, any compressed format is safe. Using backups can be easier because you can point the automatic backups on both machines to the same Dropbox folder.

    Here's a link to a workflow that will automate this somewhat. I didn't post it earlier because it's somewhat complex...

    https://getsatisfaction.com/quickencommunity/topics/faq-how-to-safely-share-your-quicken-mac-file-on...

    But to answer your question... compressing the file doesn't cause it to include the login data. That information is stored in your Mac's Keychain. The only easy way to get this info synced between the two Macs is to have both Macs signed into the same iCloud account and enable iCloud Keychain on both.
  • Hub SmilyHub Smily Member
    edited January 17
    jeffge said:

    I find it rather amazing that in a world where every other application I use can sync to the cloud, Quicken remains a local machine only application.  Can anyone explain what specific to Quicken makes this so?


    So then the question bodes...why WON'T Quicken just make a Cloud Sync that contains a true backup of your data file...rather than just bits and pieces...and thus making that data easy to use between two or more computers????  Of course, whether to sync or not would be at the users sole discretion, as it is now.  So, you could still keep your data local...or for those users that want to use the Quicken Cloud, mobile, desktop app AND a valid FULL sync that option would be available.

    Basically, sync from Computer A to Quicken Cloud.  Cloud can be used in mobile or web app by sync, as it supposedly does currently.  But can also be used when you start Computer B with a sync on startup which would give you up to date data there.

    No more hoops to go through.  No more backup and restore, then "rinse and repeat". 

    AND, the added bonus would be for those that have their hard drive destroyed, that Cloud Sync would be a valid backup of all their data.  Just look at the couple of posts from the California wildfires that have now lost their data, forever.  

    This is something that other personal finance (desktop versions) is able to do, without an issue.  And it appears from the number of posts here that this is something that would benefit quite a few users.  This doesn't seem like some "off the wall" request, but one that is being asked for on a regular basis.  

    Once again, I find Quicken's direction and implementation to be lacking and behind other software products.  It really is a shame considering they are supposed to be the leader in personal finance management software. 

    Instead, users like us are stuck with workarounds and back alleys to get what Quicken should be providing it's customers.  
  • edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    I ONLY have one file which I moved to a Dropbox folder. All fine except when I opened it on a trip using the original file...in Dropbox. Still the ONLY thing not working are the logins. Every bank, investment account, the totals and every line item all match on both Macs. This file ends in.quicken and NOT.pdf my old Win version. This file was converted by Quicken and now works in Mac 2019. Help fix its one failing!!
  • RickORickO SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Jim, We are all along talking about one file stored in Dropbox. I can (and probably will) get corrupted. You are taking a risk by storing in Dropbox. Can't make it any more clear than that.

    As far as the passwords not syncing between machines... they never will using Dropbox. The only way reasonable to get your passwords to sync across machines is to use iCloud Keychain.
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Jim, RickO answered your question just above: the login info is stored in your Mac's keychain, not within the Quicken data file. Since that's the case, you might explore using iCloud keychain to sync your passwords across your multiple Macs; I would think that would solve your problem, but I don't use it so I can't say for certain.

    That said, you seem to be ignoring the warnings that storing your data file via Dropbox is neither supported nor advised. It may work fine now, but the risk you run is that one day, without warning, the file permissions within the data file package may change and make your data file completely inaccessible. It hasn't been reported often, but we have seen such reports, which is why we steer people away from doing it. I know I wouldn't risk my decades of Quicken data to save a minutes transferring a compressed file each way.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • jeffgejeffge Member
    edited December 2018
    jeffge said:

    I find it rather amazing that in a world where every other application I use can sync to the cloud, Quicken remains a local machine only application.  Can anyone explain what specific to Quicken makes this so?


    Agreed, which is why I posed the question. They seem to have somewhat of a sync engine in that it will update the web site, which makes the lack of a machine agnostic approach seem a little dated.
  • edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    And Dropbox is NOT a gotta do for me.  Tell me how to transfer "a compressed file both ways" and I can do that.  Is this a backup to USB?
  • RickORickO SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Jim,

    First, to find your Quicken data file: in Quicken, click menu File > Show "filename" in Finder. This will open a Finder window with your Quicken file selected.

    To compress that file, right click on the file in the Finder and choose "Compress filename". 

    To un-compress a file (it will end with ".zip") just double click it.

    You can move the compressed file from one machine to the other via any means you like. You can move it using Dropbox, but just don't leave it in the Dropbox synced folder. Or you can move it with a thumb drive, as an email attachment or however else you can move a file.

    After you move the compressed file to the corresponding folder on the other machine, you can double click it to unzip it. But before doing so, trash the existing Quicken file. Then when you unzip, it will have the same name as the original (rather than having a "2" added as a duplicate of the original). 
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    You can use Dropbox to make your transfers if you wish, or iCloud, or a USB drive. The key is that the file you move is compressed. That means either (a) select your Quicken data file in the Finder and select Compress from the File menu, or (b) from within Quicken, do File > Save a Backup (which produces a file which is compressed). You can save that compressed file to your cloud service or USB drive. On the other computer, copy the compressed/backup file, double-click it, and away you go. Just repeat the process of compressing or backing up the file to move it in the opposite direction. It sounds like a lot to do, but once you've done it a few times, you'll likely find it takes only seconds to do.

    If you prefer, you can save a step by setting your Quicken Backup folder to be on Dropbox. Go to Quicken Preferences > General, and at the bottom of the box, click the button for Backup Folder. Navigate to where you want Quicken's automatic backups to go, and your backups will safely go there. (And make sure "Automatically back up data file when quitting Quicken" is checked. And make sure you quit Quicken every time you're done using it to generate such a backup file if you might be hopping between Macs. And make sure you always select the most-recent backup to download when you switch machines.)

    As noted above, you will need to either use iCloud keychain to share your account passwords between your Macs, or set up the passwords on the second Mac manually -- it should be a one-time thing for each account login you have.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • smayer97smayer97 SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    BTW, an option that would make this even more robust by triggering auto-backups NOT just when you close, is item #4 in the following. You can add your VOTE to 
    Add More Options to Automatic Back-ups.

    First, click on the underlined link above to go there, then click VOTE at the top of THAT page, so your vote will count for THIS feature and increase its visibility to the developers by seeking to have the features you need or desire end up in the latest version.

    While you are at it, you may want to add your VOTE to related IDEAS found on the 
    List of Requests for Data and File Management Features. Click on the underlined link, then follow the instructions to add your vote to more related ideas. Your VOTES matter!

    (If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)

    If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.

    (STILL using QM2007, Canadian user since '92)

    Have Questions? Check out these FAQs:
  • edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    So, understand that at 73, post subarachnoid hemorrhage, some of this makes sense, but please sprinkle some clarity dust on these couple of points:  Instead of compressing, copying, etc., I set up Mac 1 with saving the account file in a folder in dropbox that both Macs share whether home or on the road.  The file as a .QDF was over 50mb but now on the Macs, this file is only 12.1mb so why copy, compress, or do anything more than to back it up after each use?  Below find the contents of this Mac 2019 file.  Most of the folders are 0 bytes.image
    So, as I type this, Quicken for Mac 2019 is fine and all passwords work as well.  BUT if I go open this file on the other Mac, 1 or 2 logins may work but mostly I've got to re-enter them.  I've looked at KeyChain and no Quicken info there, I have seen references to a Quicken cloud but cannot tell what's in there unless I erase it and "start over."  So, back to square one,,,,,,I am.  Data is all there from the file and is correctly seen but How to share the logins between the 2 Macs when I cannot find where they are stored.  And why all the compression talk when this is a small file?  Jim
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited December 2018

    There is no way to sync the file. Moving the data file back and fourth (via restoring as you mentioned) is the most practical means to safely share your data. Some people also suggest remote access login of one machine. That will also work if you are familiar with that.

    I do not suggest trying to share the file on a networked/web share location. Some say it works, but I have seen too many problems to recommend it.

    Jim, you seem to be glossing over the advice that's been given multiple times above: using Dropbox for your Quicken data file is not recommended and not supported. It may appear to work fine today, but at some point, without warning, you may find yourself completely locked out of your data. Quicken's database is built to have the data file locally on your Mac, not on any cloud-based server.

    Compression has nothing to do with file size in this case. It's about file permissions. Your Quicken data file is actually not just a file. It's a Mac entity known as a 'package', which is basically a wrapper that makes an entire hierarchy of files and folders inside it appear to the user as if it's a single file. (Want to see what I'm describing? Right-click (Control-click) on your Quicken data file to select it, and select "Show Package Contents" from the dropdown list. Lo and behold, you'll now see a folder of additional folders, each with more files, and a key file called "data" which is your actual database file.) On a Mac, every file and folder has permission settings which tell a Mac who can read the contents therein, who can change the contents, and to whom the contents should be not accessible. This is normally all invisible to the user, and noting to be concerned with. But when you move a file -- and in the case of a Quicken data file, you're moving all the files and folders it contains -- between different computers, the macOS can get confused about who the owner and allowed users of files and folders are. In most cases, there's no problem, but if a permission setting is off, the Quicken application may be unable to access the data it needs within the data file, and you end up locked out. And it's not something where we know it's one specific file and setting that needs to be fixed. And -- here's the key -- when you compress a file into a .zip (or backup) file, the file permissions of everything within can't get messed up in moving from one Mac to another. That is why we keep insisting that the safe way to move a Quicken data file between two Macs is to only move a compressed file.

    All I can tell you is that we have had users who have been completely locked out of their data file by doing what you're doing. If you want to proceed anyway, I wish you the best of luck, but you have been warned that you're flirting with disaster.

    As for sharing your logins, I have mentioned several times that the way you can do this is with iCloud keychain, which lets your logins be shared among different devices using the same iCloud login.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
Sign In or Register to comment.