Quicken Community is moving to Single Sign On! Starting 1/22/21, you'll sign in to the community with your Quicken ID. For more information: http://bit.ly/CommunitySSO

Reports Need to Show Taxable vs Non-Taxable Investment Returns

Steve29
Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
edited February 2020 in Investments (Mac)
I'm still using both Q2007 and Q2020 and now that it's tax time, I am recording the tax consequences of various investments. Q2020 makes this much harder. Q2007 separates Dividends, Long Term Capital Gains and Realized Gains into two categories -- taxable and non-taxable. Q2020 lumps taxable & non-taxable together into a single total. So you have to export an Excel file, sort it properly and add everything up yourself. What a waste of time.

Of course, Q2020 'knows' the difference between taxable and non-taxable gains, because they are in different kinds of accounts (the non-taxable stuff is in IRAs) but there's no way to indicate that these are taxable or non-taxable accounts, as there is in Q2007.

In the attached images, you can see the way Q2007 allows you to show that an account is tax deferred, something Q2020 has no provision for. And you can see the difference in reports -- Q2007 breaks out taxable and non-taxable. Q2020 doesn't.

This is just silly and needs to be fixed.
3
3 votes

New · Last Updated

Comments

  • Steve29
    Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
    I should add that even though Q2020 doesn't have a checkbox for "tax deferred", it does allow you to categorize an account as an IRA, which is the same thing. The problem is that this seems to make no difference as far as taxability of gains is concerned. That's a big omission.
  • J_Mike
    J_Mike SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    No, QMac does not have a single report that differentiates between taxable and non-taxable investment returns.

    Have you looked at the Tax Schedule Report? This report summarizes all taxable information.
    QWin & QMac (Deluxe) Subscription
    Quicken user since 1991

  • Steve29
    Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
    edited February 2020
    Thanks for that. I just tried it. I guess you have to make the assumption that anything listed as "Dividends" is actually taxable dividends. And then you do a category summary to see total Dividends and compare.

    But there are several problems with this. First, the numbers don't match up with anything reported in Q2007. Okay, I could try to compare the individual transactions and figure out what the difference is. But the problem with doing that is that the Tax Schedule doesn't indicate which account the transactions come from--the report within Quicken shows it, but the CSV leaves it out. So you have to make multiple reports, with each showing a separate account. That's a lot of work.

    But the fact that Quicken seems to know what's taxable and what isn't just goes to show that it could easily split out taxable and non-taxable returns in a category summary.

    Thanks again -- I hope this improves in the future.
  • Steve29
    Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
    edited February 2020
    Mike -- one more question. My data was originally imported from Q2007. And I see now that my IRAs were not categorized as IRAs. To try your Tax Summary report idea I made a copy of my data file and recategorized them. That didn't seem to do any harm, but I'm wondering what kinds of effects such a change might have.

    Thanks for any light you can shed --
  • J_Mike
    J_Mike SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    Steve29 said:
    Mike -- one more question. My data was originally imported from Q2007. And I see now that my IRAs were not categorized as IRAs. To try your Tax Summary report idea I made a copy of my data file and recategorized them. That didn't seem to do any harm, but I'm wondering what kinds of effects such a change might have.

    Thanks for any light you can shed --
    I take "recategorized them" to mean that you changed the account type from some other type to an IRA Account. I would recommend you do this for your regular data file. I am not aware of any negative effects. 

    An interesting feature of QMac is that one can readily change an account type - e.g., from a brokerage to different taxdeferred and then change them back. The only noticeable effect is the account moves back and forth between the Brokerage group and the Retirement group.
    QWin & QMac (Deluxe) Subscription
    Quicken user since 1991

  • Steve29
    Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
    Great. Thanks. That's what it appeared to do, but I wasn't sure if I was missing something. Other than starting a thread here, is there a better way to lobby for the taxable vs. non-taxable reporting?
  • J_Mike
    J_Mike SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Steve29
    Back to your original query regarding taxable vs nontaxable dividends.

    You can use the flexibility of the QMac investment registers to help get quick answers.

    Example for dividends;
    Select the Investing group header in the sidebar.
    Select Transactions.
    Set Date Range to Last Year.
    Select All Investing Accounts.
    Select Income.
    The register now displays all investment account income transactions for last year.

    Move up to the Search field - upper-right.
    Enter Dividend Income.
    The register now displays a;; dividends for last year.
    The total dividends is at top-right of register.

    Now change All Investing Accounts to All Brokerage Accounts.
    Register displays all taxable dividends.

    Change to All Retirement Accounts to see nontaxable dividends.

    Note that you can also select each individual account to get totals by account.

    This doesn't give you everything in a single view - but it gets you good info quickly and easier than generating reports.

    Note in Searching - click on the magnifying glass to get a drop-down list of columns. You can narrow the search to a specific column (must be a displayed column).
    QWin & QMac (Deluxe) Subscription
    Quicken user since 1991

  • Steve29
    Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
    Thanks Mike. Good to know -- and it will undoubtedly be useful in other contexts. But here, it didn't work for me. Searching for "dividend Income" works for something like a CD where the dividend generates cash in the account. But for an investment account, you're looking for "reinvest dividend". You can search for those, but since they are reinvestments they don't produce cash and the total is zero, which isn't helpful. I want a total of the "invest amt" column, not the "Amount" column. Can't see how to get it.
  • J_Mike
    J_Mike SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    For your example of Dividends (cash) or Reinvedt Dividend, the default Category is the same - Dividend Income. Make sure that the Category column is displayed in your register and the search will give you both cash and reinvestments.
    QWin & QMac (Deluxe) Subscription
    Quicken user since 1991

  • Steve29
    Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
    Sorry to disagree, but the correct category would be Reinvest Dividend. No cash is added to the account, as it would be with a Dividend Income transaction. The dividends are immediately turned back into shares of the fund. So when Quicken adds up the Amount column, the total is zero. What I'm looking for is a total of the value of the transaction. That's what's relevant for taxes, and that's what you see totaled in Q2007 and (presumably) in the Tax Schedule report.
  • J_Mike
    J_Mike SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    The transaction Type is different - Dividend Income vs Reinvest Dividend.
    The default Category is the same for both - Investments:Dividend Income

    See screenshot for examples of each Type.
    QWin & QMac (Deluxe) Subscription
    Quicken user since 1991

  • Steve29
    Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
    Yes, I understand. But my "Reinvest Dividend" transactions don't produce a "balance". From the picture you've post, it looks like yours don't either -- you're only getting a total for "Dividend Income." The Reinvestment produces $0. So a total of those transactions would be zero.
  • J_Mike
    J_Mike SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    OOOPS - it finally dawned on me what you have been saying.
    You are correct - the underlying value for reinvested dividends is not included in the total.
    QWin & QMac (Deluxe) Subscription
    Quicken user since 1991

  • Steve29
    Steve29 Member ✭✭✭
    Thanks, Mike. Your suggestions were helpful anyway, and the Tax Schedule is good to know about. But reporting is one of the weakest things about QMac and I'm wondering whether there's anything else I can do to weigh in on the need for improvements.
  • Leslie Jones
    Leslie Jones Member ✭✭
    I would totally agree with Steve 29. I have also experienced lots of problems differentiating between Investment income that is NT and Taxable. I much prefer the Q2007 way of doing it. Here is an example: I have some investment fees associated with an IRA. That is unusual. If I select the IRA in my accounts for a report (Cash Flow as an example) in order to include the Investment expense it will also include all the other investment income I have selected like Cap Gains, etc. That is not what I want. I can't separate it. And I don't do my taxes with Quicken so I need NT and T as separate categories. It seems Quicken just assumes everyone does that.
Sign In or Register to comment.