Renewal Price Increase Too High

Redeye
Redeye Member
edited May 7 in The Water Cooler
The most recent renewal price increase from Quicken is simply too much. All I use the product for is investment tracking. Presently, I can get the same for free from [Removed - 3rd-Party Product]. As a long-time Quicken user, I hate to stop using the product, but I'm afraid they are making it too expensive. Bye-bye Quicken.

Comments

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    edited April 28
    @Redeye I doubt anyone in Quicken management will see your comment here, but perhaps such comments get aggregated and passed on.

    I'd note that the subscription renewal prices have only gone up by $2 over the past four years (Quicken Deluxe subscriptions were $49.99 in fall 2017 when subscriptions began, and are $51.99 now). If you're comparing to the old days when you could buy Quicken once every three years to maintain download services, the price is indeed higher compared to what it once was. (Quicken wasn't making enough of a profit, which is why it stagnated at Intuit until Quicken was sold in 2016; it wasn't surprising when they increased the cost in 2017 in order to add staff to make the products and support better. ) 

    If you only use a limited subset of what Quicken can do, and you can be happy with another product at a lower cost, then it can make sense to move on. You lose your investing history in Quicken, but perhaps that's not critical for you. But also beware that while [Removed - 3rd-Party Product] is free on the surface, there's no such thing as a free lunch… or free personal finance software. ;) [Removed - 3rd-Party Product] is used online, so it's not as private or secure as Quicken desktop software which maintains its data file on your computer. More importantly, you might want to read this article about how you're giving up your private financial data to [Removed - 3rd-Party Product], which uses it for aggressive ads and marketing to try to get you to purchase services.I wouldn't accept such a service, but if you're not concerned about their marketing and sharing of your data for marketing, it may be all the tools you need for managing your investments. Best wishes. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Redeye
    Redeye Member
    edited April 28
    I agree that it is doubtful that any Quicken management will ever see this comment. And maybe that's the core problem. They've lost touch with their loyal customers.

    In terms of [Removed - 3rd-Party Product], undoubtedly they will use my joining as an opportunity to hound me for their advisory services. That's what call screening and email filters are for. And the fact that my data is in their server is of no greater concern than Quicken having access to my data. Given that they push update notices and require periodic logins just tells me that my data is also within their grasp.

    Finally, customer support is just another term for paying them to fix their buggy software. We are all doing part of their job by testing and reporting the things they sloppily pushed out.

    All that being said, I would rather not leave Quicken behind. I am familiar with it's pitfalls. [Removed - Speculation]  So, I will vote with my feet and walk away.
  • NotACPA
    NotACPA SuperUser ✭✭✭✭
    @Redeye If all that you want is investment tracking, why not just use your broker's website?
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription, Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • Jeanine Schmidt
    Jeanine Schmidt Member ✭✭
    edited April 28
    I'm holding for 'chat'; but, last year the renewal through my Quicken Deluxe software was higher than just buying a new program so that's what I did. Now, when I look around I can only get it for $7 less at Office Depot. But, when you 'google' and go to Quicken.Com it says 40% off at $31.19. I just saw at the bottom, in small print, it does say new customers only. If I used a different email address how would they know I'm not a new customer; it is $20 less doing this. Thanks for any comments. Also, I don't use any of the 'automatic update' features.
  • BK
    BK Member ✭✭✭✭
    ... If I used a different email address how would they know I'm not a new customer; it is $20 less doing this. Thanks for any comments.
    They don't.  You are a new customer with a new email.  But consider at least two things: (a) Do you want to do that every year to save $20?  The $20 which is less than the cost of two glasses of wine as an example goes to fund and improve the program you and I are using.  It's like my wife reminding me to buy local so that our local businesses survive or we'll have an empty stores and loss of local taxes for the benefit of the community. (b) If you have any type of bill pay setups and I don't know what else, that may cause problems going from one Quicken ID to another using the same data file.  So you'd have to disable everything first and recreate them in the new one.
    - QWin Deluxe user since 2010, US subscription on Win11
    - I don't use Cloud Sync, Mobile & Web, Bill Pay/Mgr

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Redeye said:
    I agree that it is doubtful that any Quicken management will ever see this comment. And maybe that's the core problem. They've lost touch with their loyal customers.
    Probably not. They have detailed stats on the number of people using Quicken , the number who renew before their subscription expires, the number who renew shortly after they subscription has expired, the number who continue to use Quicken manually with an expired subscription, and the number who stop using Quicken completely. If those numbers showed they were constantly bleeding customers, they would at least experiment with lower pricing to see if they could retain more users, or if other factors were driving people away. All together, I'd say they likely have very good metrics about customer retention and loss, and a pretty good idea to what extent price is costing them customers. So they haven't lost touch with their customers; to the contrary, they keep close tabs on their customers. Do they know people don't like higher annual prices? Sure. Do they know to what extent higher annual prices are driving people away? I'd say they do. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Redeye
    Redeye Member
    The fact that Quicken only offers their "teaser rates" for new customers speaks to their lack of concern about customers. This new customer discount is just part of the high cost of customer acquisition. This is expensive.

    However, as any skilled business person knows, the lowest cost customer is an existing customer. With Quicken, the existing customer is getting taken for granted and is being strong-armed into paying the highest prices.
  • Ps56k2
    Ps56k2 SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    Redeye said: The fact that Quicken only offers their "teaser rates" for new customers
    speaks to their lack of concern about customers.
    Every business does this - look at all the cell phone carriers, Internet access, exercise memberships, cable tv, etc

    QWin Deluxe Subscription - Win10
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    As @Ps56k2 says, most things which are sold as subscriptions work this way. Look at magazine and newspaper (or news website) subscriptions; there are almost always introductory teaser rates for new subscribers. Satellite radio (e.g Sirius XM) is the same. Internet and cable TV is the same. As for computer software, none of the software subscriptions I'm aware of have a lower rate for renewing customers than new customers.

    In the previous pricing model when Quicken was part of Intuit, they had trained users to wait for significantly (30-40%) discounted prices either directly from the company or from retailers in order to purchase new releases — a pricing paradigm which benefitted customers but cost the company millions of dollars. When they moved to subscription pricing 5 years ago, one of the goals was clearly to increase income, even at the cost of losing a small number of customers. That doesn't mean they have a "lack of concern about customers"; it means they needed more revenue to maintain and drive ongoing development and support of the programs. Of course, customers never like higher prices, so they were testing whether they could deliver enough improvements that most customers would decide to stick with Quicken. Since they haven't changed this pricing structure since creating it in 2017, we are left to conclude that it's working for them, and that the majority of customers have accepted the higher cost and find Quicken provides enough value to continue paying for it.
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Redeye
    Redeye Member
    If you look around, you will see a lot of long time users complaining about Quicken's pricing model. Most of these disgruntled users feel that loyalty does not matter and that Quicken has taken a monopoly mindset. Quicken's behavior borders on arrogant.

    Further research shows that Quicken is not only overcharging their customers, They are also charging the financial institutions exorbitant fees to use their proprietary QXF protocol. (Which is nothing more than a slightly tweaked version of the open standard OXF.) And when they moved to the QFX protocol, they removed all other options. Another monopolistic tactic.

    As a result, there is a strong desire for other options. And fortunately, the market is responding. There are options. Just don't mention them here, because the monopolist will redact them.
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Redeye said:
    If you look around, you will see a lot of long time users complaining about Quicken's pricing model. Most of these disgruntled users feel that loyalty does not matter and that Quicken has taken a monopoly mindset. Quicken's behavior borders on arrogant.

    Further research shows that Quicken is not only overcharging their customers, They are also charging the financial institutions exorbitant fees to use their proprietary QXF protocol. (Which is nothing more than a slightly tweaked version of the open standard OXF.) And when they moved to the QFX protocol, they removed all other options. Another monopolistic tactic.
    @Redeye Quicken is by no means a Monopoly; in fact, there's probably more competition for them than ever before. A lot of that is due to banks and brokerages beefing up their online features and trying to get consumers to center their financial lives around them instead of a third-party application like Quicken. And there are more online personal finance platforms than ever, as younger people gravitate towards online-only apps and web-based products over dinosaur computer programs like Quicken.

    As for Quicken's fees, I'd note that people have always complained that Quicken charged too much. Back in the days when you had to buy a new version every three years to continue using download services, each fall there would be streams of users complaining that they shouldn't have to buy the whole new version and that Quicken should offer a lower upgrade price to loyal existing users. And Intuit's fees for their QFX service have been around for decades; it's nothing new. And it's largely out of Quicken's control, since they're independent on Intuit and must pay Intuit to provide their connectivity services.

    Redeye said:
    As a result, there is a strong desire for other options. There are options. Just don't mention them here, because the monopolist will redact them.
    Do you see the ironic humor in what you just wrote? You call Quicken a monopoly in the same sentence you note — correctly — that there are viable competitors. Both can't be true. ;) 

    Look, I get it; no one likes higher prices. But you have to look at the big picture. Quicken was bought out from Intuit by a venture capital firm, and has now been sold to another. Money to pay those parent companies has to come from somewhere, and that's likely a major reason Quicken now charges more than it once did. But also, Quicken didn't have the financial resources it needed at Intuit, and it's modest profit margin and slow growth is why Intuit decided to part with the business that their company was founded around. Quicken Mac nearly died under Intuit's control, and the programming team was just a handful of people until the company become in dependent in 2016. So although I don't like the higher cost, I'm happy that Quicken and the Mac product were rescued from a likely slow death, and that with increased revenue, there's a reasonable path for it to remain around for a long while.

    I've looked at competing products here and there, and I've read what other users have said about some of them. I don't know that anything else has the breadth of features Quicken does — but not everyone needs all the features, so some people can be satisfied with other products or platforms. So each of us has to evaluate whether we get value from Quicken commensurate with what it costs. Quicken Deluxe costs about $4 a month. When I compare that to other things I purchase and there services I subscribe to (rather than comparing to what I paid a decade ago), I find that a worthwhile cost to pay. You might not — and if you can find a product with a narrow feature set for less money, that might be the best alternative for you. There will be different answers for different people depending what they want or need out of a personal finance program. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • BK
    BK Member ✭✭✭✭
    Redeye said:
    Further research shows that Quicken is not only overcharging their customers, They are also charging the financial institutions exorbitant fees to use their proprietary QXF protocol.
    @Redeye , would you kindly share the sources of your research so that I can become more informed.  Thank you.
    - QWin Deluxe user since 2010, US subscription on Win11
    - I don't use Cloud Sync, Mobile & Web, Bill Pay/Mgr

  • Chris_QPW
    Chris_QPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    Redeye said:
    They are also charging the financial institutions exorbitant fees to use their proprietary QXF protocol. (Which is nothing more than a slightly tweaked version of the open standard OXF.) And when they moved to the QFX protocol, they removed all other options. Another monopolistic tactic.
    Quicken Inc doesn't charge financial institutions anything.  Quicken Inc pays Intuit for the online services, Direct Connect, Express Web Connect, and Web Connect.  It is Intuit that is charging.

    And the reports say that Intuit isn't charging for Express Web Connect, which most financial institutions have gone to.

    And I might add that if they hadn't tweaked the OFX standard and charged for it back then, Quicken might not be here for you to complain about.  Microsoft didn't charge, but years ago figured that it wasn't profitable for them, and got out of the market.
    Signature:
    (I'm always using the latest Quicken Windows Premier subscription version)
    This is my website: http://www.quicknperlwiz.com/
  • Levoy H
    Levoy H SuperUser, Windows Beta, Mac Beta ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 6
    Since moving to subscriptions the price Quicken has ballooned roughly 300%. That's just simple math.  As for all those improvements we are funding, Quicken looks pretty much the same to me as it did 5+ years ago - clunky and cumbersome.  Hearing that argument is like hearing the cable company bragging about all the new channels they added for that rate increase.  Never mind that I never watch any of them.  

    [Removed - Rant]
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Levoy H said:
    Since moving to subscriptions the price Quicken has ballooned roughly 300%. That's just simple math.
    Well, yes and no. Pre-Subscription pricing, if you purchased the new release of Quicken every year, the retail price was 30% higher than today's subscription price. There was a lot of discounting, though, so if you knew where and when to shop, you could perhaps get Quicken Deluxe for about $35-$40 instead of the retail price of $74.99. So buying a Quicken subscription today is somewhere between 30% less than it was five years ago and 50% more than 5 years ago. But not 300% more. 

    Of course, many people didn't buy the new version every year. Because the program provided online capabilities for three years, many people purchased the program every other year or every third year. So if you purchased every third year at $50, and now pay every year the same $50, the price for you has indeed tripled. To be fair, in return you now get continuous product updates rather than waiting three years to get bug fixes and improved features. You may not consider the upgrades worth the higher cost, but you are getting something more for the money. 

    Levoy H said:
    This is what we get when there is no competition.  
    Two quick comments about this statement (which I hear other Quicken users repeat). First, there is competition, and more of it now than ever in the past. But competing programs may not be as full-featured as Quicken. Which leads to the second point: people want the features they find in Quicken, but want to pay less for it, when the reality is that keeping Quicken working, let alone building new features, requires more, not less money. The reason Microsoft dropped MS Money is that it was becoming ever-more complex, and it couldn't generate enough revenue to sustain it. Other competitors started out costing less, but now are comparable to Quicken. It takes a lot of resources — programmers, designers, testers — to build and maintain software as complex as Quicken. 

    For those of us who are Quicken Mac users, it's pretty easy to see that the company is spending money to steadily improve the program. If you compare Quicken Mac today to what originally came out 8 years ago, the gains are readily apparent, useful, and very welcome — and there's still much more to do. Quicken Windows is a much more mature product, with fewer new bells  whistles to add, but simply maintaining it — think about something like modernizing the screen display to allow dark mode — requires re-writing large chunks of code which may be decades old and can't just be tweaked to add new functionality. Quicken Windows is more like Microsoft Word: most of the key capabilities have been in place for decades, but there are still improvements being made, as well as modernizing the underlying code to keep up with operating system upgrades, bigger and better screens, etc. In the end, we each decide it it's useful enough for us to keep paying fr it, or it we can do without it or make do with a program which may be cheaper but also likely lacks some features found in Quicken.
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Damian
    Damian Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 6
    For those that say that Quicken's current subscription price is too high.  Here is what I actually paid throughout the years for Quicken Premier:

    Quicken Premier 2009 (64.43) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2010 (64.35) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2011 (85.80) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2012 (96.99) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2013 (96.99) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2014 (113.15) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2015 (102.38) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2016 (102.38) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2017 (107.76) Direct from Intuit
    Quicken Premier 2018 (81.00) Direct from Quicken
    Quicken Sub pd thru 2019 (48.24) Sam's Club - 2 yr Sub
    Quicken Sub pd thru 2020 (48.24) Sam's Club - 2 yr Sub
    Quicken Sub pd thru 2021 (48.31) Sam's Club
    Quicken Sub pd thru 2022 (48.81) Sam's Club
    Quicken Sub pd thru 2023 (53.53) Sam's Club

    As you can see the price was higher when Intuit owned Quicken and before the subscription model was put into place.  
    (Quicken Premier Subscription R40.21 on Windows 11 Pro)
  • Chris_QPW
    Chris_QPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    The people complaining are probably prorating the cost because they only bought Quicken every three years.

    If one wants to see the people that really made out by going to the Subscription, it would be the people that bought the Rental Properties edition every year.

    When they decide to just have one edition, removing the in between Home & Business edition, they used the price for the old Home & Business edition instead of the one they were using for the Rental Properties edition.  So, these days the Rental Properties features come for no extra cost over the Home & Business edition/features.
    Signature:
    (I'm always using the latest Quicken Windows Premier subscription version)
    This is my website: http://www.quicknperlwiz.com/
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    @Chris_QPW True on both counts… but let's be real. The number of people who purchased the old top-priced Rental Property version is a very small subset of the Quicken user community. And the number of people who bought a new version every year, like Damian above, is smaller than the number who bought every second or third year. So while it's correct that the price is actually lower for some Quicken users, the typical Quicken user who feels the price has gone up since the advent of subscriptions is also correct, because for them, it has.

    That all said, the old days are exactly that — a piece of the past. Quicken wasn't making enough money a decade ago to drive development of improved and updated products, and new products to expand its customer base. So establishing a higher average cost per customer was undoubtedly part of the plan to have a venture capital company buy out Quicken from Intuit and set it on a course to thrive on its own. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Damian
    Damian Member ✭✭✭✭
    Quicken was, is, and will be, the most important software I have on my computer.  I always upgrade whenever I can.  It is important for me to keep Quicken running smoothly.   I know there will be issues that need to be dealt with from time to time.  In that respect, I keep up with issue resolution, and have learned "best practices" when it comes to Quicken.  It is to my benefit that Quicken thrives and keeps improving.  Therefore, I am willing to pay whatever I need to for Quicken.  In my opinion, Quicken has significantly improved since I started using it in 2009.
    (Quicken Premier Subscription R40.21 on Windows 11 Pro)
  • BK
    BK Member ✭✭✭✭
    Back then I bought/renewed when my 3-yr term expired.  I can see that I am paying more but not complaining at all.  I have been a supporter all along for the record.
    I agree with @Levoy H as being cumbersome and this is what "I" mean by it:  We now have 2-4 releases per month (Windows side), most of which are problematic.  Terrible R39.17 & 21, and finally R39.21 recused them.  R40.xx are problematic as of this writing.  I have stayed on the solid R37.67 and have no plans to update and would consider staying on it for the next n-years if I could.  So it is cumbersome to continuously review this community and read painful user experiences losing their data file for a password problem that has been around for couple of years or opening balances changing for the past 10 years when you deactivate/reactivate an account, etc.
    So I test the latest on a VM to see if it is an upgrade candidate due to lack of trust and it is cumbersome.  I remain positive that the Quicken management would consider a different approach some day.  My apologies for going off topic.  I feel for the Mods here, I really do, and would do anything to help and support them and the users.
    - QWin Deluxe user since 2010, US subscription on Win11
    - I don't use Cloud Sync, Mobile & Web, Bill Pay/Mgr

  • Chris_QPW
    Chris_QPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    In a way I think the title of this thread is not "complete".

    It probably should be:
    "Renewal Price Increase Too High for my use case"

    Even "free" is too much if one finds themselves not getting any benefit out of any program or service.
    After that one has to weigh the cost vs benefit for their use case, and this can't be universally applied to everyone.

    In my own case as times goes on and my financial life is getting simpler, I can easily see me handling my finances without Quicken.  But why should I?

    To me it is a trivial amount of money for what it does.
    Signature:
    (I'm always using the latest Quicken Windows Premier subscription version)
    This is my website: http://www.quicknperlwiz.com/
  • BK
    BK Member ✭✭✭✭
    LOL, Well said @Chris_QPW
    - QWin Deluxe user since 2010, US subscription on Win11
    - I don't use Cloud Sync, Mobile & Web, Bill Pay/Mgr

  • Redeye
    Redeye Member
    Quicken's only real value to me has been with the investment tracking downloads. That's it. All of the rest of the product never gets used. So, the price I pay to simply retrieve my data for my investments, using Quicken's minor modification of the open source OFX standard is indeed too high. Fortunately, I am a software engineer, so creating a workaround for this is a reachable solution.
  • Levoy H
    Levoy H SuperUser, Windows Beta, Mac Beta ✭✭✭✭✭
    So while it's correct that the price is actually lower for some Quicken users, the typical Quicken user who feels the price has gone up since the advent of subscriptions is also correct, because for them, it has.

    BINGO!  Why in the world would you buy a new program when the old one worked just fine?  Plus, a new version always introduces risk that I don't need.  As the old saying goes, sometimes it's truly, "Better the devil you know...."
  • Chris_QPW
    Chris_QPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 18
    Levoy H said:
    So while it's correct that the price is actually lower for some Quicken users, the typical Quicken user who feels the price has gone up since the advent of subscriptions is also correct, because for them, it has.

    BINGO!  Why in the world would you buy a new program when the old one worked just fine?  Plus, a new version always introduces risk that I don't need.  As the old saying goes, sometimes it's truly, "Better the devil you know...."
    Because most people aren't buying Quicken to just get a program, they are buying it to get some services.

    If all you need is "the program" then you probably should have stopped at Quicken 2013, which was the last version that doesn't require a Quicken Id.  Or at least stopped at Quicken 2017 which mostly only needs the free Quicken Id.

    But if you need services, like downloading transactions then you are paying for that service, and part of that is keeping the software current enough so that it will work with whatever changes Quicken Inc needs to put in to keep the services running and provide what features they feel they need to put in to sell the product.  Because without that, there will not be any Quicken Inc/Quicken/services.
    Signature:
    (I'm always using the latest Quicken Windows Premier subscription version)
    This is my website: http://www.quicknperlwiz.com/
  • mrzookie
    mrzookie Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 17
    From 2009-2020, my average annual Quicken expense was about $27. Sometimes I used it for 3 years before updating, but other times there were new features I wanted so I updated after 2 years, or even 1. Since going on the subscription plan, my annual cost has increased to about $45, so its up about $18/yr.

    How do I know this? Yeah, it took me about 9 seconds to log into Quicken and do a search. That ability alone makes it worth it to me.
  • jtemplin
    jtemplin Member ✭✭✭✭
    mrzookie said:
    From 2009-2020, my average annual Quicken expense was about $27.

    You took inflation into account, didn't you? $1 in 2009 is $1.35 in 2022. I'd bet your average cost, in constant dollars is still more, but not as much as you think. 

    https://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

    At the end of the day, there's the $64,000 question: is that incremental cost worth it to you for the services you receive and/or less than the cost (in your time) of switching to something else which has tons of problems of its own? YMMV, but for me, who hopes to use Quicken to navigate retirement for at least another 10-15 years (God willIng), it's worth every penny.
  • mrzookie
    mrzookie Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 18
    Didn't bother with inflation. Inflation was low (2% give or take) from 2009-2019, but the calculator numbers are skewed bc of what's happened over the last year or 2. In any case, it wouldn't throw the numbers all that much. Maybe the average cost from 2009-2019 would increase to $32. Avg cost from for the last 3 yrs would go to maybe $54. Percentage-wise, it looks big, but in real dollars its small. And, in fact, I paid the same in 2022 as I did in 2021, so no inflation there at all. Its all theoretical. Still worth it, no matter what.
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    We can do all sorts of comparisons between pricing a decade or more ago and now, but ultimately, that dollar or percentage increase is not really relevant. Yes, Quicken costs more today than it once did. Does that make it overpriced now? Or was it perhaps an underpriced bargain then? It doesn't matter.

    What matters is whether it delivers sufficient value to you today for the current cost. A Quicken subscription costs about $4/month. Compared to many other products and services, that's not really a lot of money. But someone who uses it only to manage a single checking account could fairly conclude the don't get enough from it to be worth the cost, just as someone who uses it to bring together checking, savings, credit card, investment and loan accounts in one place as they plan for or navigate through retirement might consider it entirely worth the price.

    We all use Quicken differently, so it makes sense different people will come to different conclusions about whether Quicken delivers enough value. For most of the people reading this forum, that answer is yes. For those who decide otherwise, that's fine — assuming they can find a less-expensive different tool to adequately handle their personal finances. Complaining that the price is too high, or that it's gone up too much since the old days, doesn't accomplish anything; each of us either decides it's a useful tool worth the cost, or we move to a different tool which better meets our needs. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993