Version/Platform Parity

Dajd987
Dajd987 Member
edited September 17 in The Water Cooler
Hello everyone and welcome to 2022.

It is high time that Quicken implement version parity and portability across all its platforms.

Why can I not run Quicken on my PC and my Mac and have them sync the same file?
Why can my web profile not display my debt and loan transactions? They don't cease to exist just because I'm using a browser.
Do Mac users really not have a need for savings goals? Is the whole idea for those goals so PC users can save for a Mac?

I understand that certain platforms attract users of certain features more but the exclusion of those features when they are available on other platforms is no longer acceptable in an app portable world especially given the subscription model.

Comments

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    This s a subject that's been discussed for many years. Actually there are two separate issues you've raised: portability of the data file between platforms, and feature parity between platforms. And I will say from the start that I would welcome both. But…

    The problem with such a wish is that Quicken Windows and Quicken Mac use different databases, and the way the applications function on each platform is closely tied to features in the underlying operating system. Unifying around one database would require basically starting over with development of everything beneath the user interface level for one or both programs. Matching features requires not only making the databases comparable (although not necessarily interchangeable) but actually programming those features.

    The modern Quicken Mac debuted 8 years ago, in August 2014, built on the code and basic interface of Quicken Essentials for Mac which had been created five years earlier. Ever since then, the Mac development team has been working to add features and functionality to achieve parity with Quicken Windows (and the legacy Quicken Mac 2007). The development team was tiny at the start, and has grown some since then, but it's still believed to be a fairly small team. And after 8 years of work, they're still years away from achieving parity with the features in Quicken Windows. 

    Quicken Window has a different problem: it uses a very old database, and some of the code is quite old and difficult to modify without breaking. Parts of the program were coded using programming languages and frameworks which aren't used today, so making even small canes can require significant re-writing of code.

    Taking the lessons learned from the rebuilding of Quicken Mac, it seems highly unlikely to me that they could bring the two programs together. Quicken Mac has 10+ years of work behind it, and still isn't done. If they were to re-write Quicken Windows to use the same database as Quicken Mac, it would take many, many years. And adding the missing features in Quicken Mac to match Quicken Windows is something they've been working on, but will still take many years. I don't think there's a shortcut for either. Hiring a ton of additional developers could shorten the timeframes, and they clearly don't have the size and budget to do that.

    Ultimately, it seems like the web-based Quicken Simplify product they created has the best potential to evolve into the cross-platform tool you're asking for. But it, too, would require many more years of programming to add many of the features from the desktop programs to the web interface and cloud-based product. 

    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
This discussion has been closed.