7/12/18: An update from our CEO, Eric Dunn

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Comments

  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018

    I have used Quicken for many years. I want to know since I am an individual will I be required to purchase a subscription or will I still be able to purchase the program every few years? I see no need for a subscription no more than I use it.

    You're thinking a subscription is something significantly different -- but it isn't.

    If you don't need to download from financial institutions, then you don't need to maintain a subscription. If you do need to download, then you need a subscription. Which is just like in the past, when you only needed to purchase a new version very third year if you wanted to retain downloading capabilities. (The only real difference is that it's now two year subscriptions, instead of every-third-year purchases.)
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • rhermanrherman Member
    edited July 2018

    Most of the improvements are just fine, but  being able , in the mac version, to adjust the print type face, size , font and style, isn't going to happen. Right?   Around here, there is a saying we use  when someone says they are working on it, have referred it and deep down inside we know that " I think you are pissing on my boots and telling me it is raining."   the guy you referred me to  essentially said it is a very low priority and probably never will be considered or worked on.   Wow.

    I have been a Quicken user since version 1 for DOS.  I have watched it become a very valuable tool for financial and data management, and could print  reports in any page size that I liked. 1 page W x 3 pages long or whatever I needed.  This new Quicken 17 took away all my printing options and I don't understand how or why that was necessary.  I would really like to see that interface fixed. 

    Rollin Herman

  • NeofactionNeofaction Member
    edited July 2018
    Appreciate the update! Being using quicken since 1.0. Can not wait to see the new EWC! Would love to see an improve mortgage tracking workflow as well!
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018

    I just wanted to make sure that Intuit knew that I have been a long time user of their products and I will no longer use any of their products since they have decided to control what I can purchase with credit cards that they process transactions for.  I have used Turbo Tax alone for at least 13 years!  Good riddance!

    Billie, Quicken used to be owned by Intuit, but it isn't now. Quicken is an independent company.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018

    I bought the new Quicken to find out that it would not work with the IOS that have have on my Mac. My main function with Quicken-is to download transactions from my back so I can produce reports for my income taxes. I don’t need all the other functions. My Mac works just fine for me as I mainly use it for the downloads. Is there any other way to get the downloads?

    Sherry, I suggest you click the New Post button at the top of this screen and create a new thread about what version of macOS you have on your computer, and what version of Quicken you have. Some of the Mac users here will be able to help advise you on what is or isn't possible.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • rudiedreyerrudiedreyer Member
    edited July 2018
    I agree with Bob Hollister.  I'm retired and on a mostly fixed income.  I prefer to upgrade when I'm ready, about every 3rd year.  I've been doing this for at least fifteen years.  Give us a choice.  If you do not publish a stand-alone version, I guess I'll have to look elsewhere.
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018
    Jim Stone said:

    I don't have a problem w/ the subscription model but what I do ask is that your company simply set a competitive, attractive subscription rate and stick to it, raising or lowering it as needed to KTBR. As you are operating now, you induce customers to wait for the next big discount, or simply wait, as I am, until the version being used no longer works. I'd happy move to the latest version if you did this. As it is, I think I can safely wait until 2020 before I need to upgrade, which may be a risk for me and will defer revenue for you. 

    On a related note, and this is just my opinion, I really like the scrum approach that other subscription services are using: a regular cadence of incremental releases, elimination of the 2018/2019/etc titles, publication of release notes, a more open feedback mechanism, and perhaps dev/beta/stable channels for those users who like to participate. If everyone is truly on the subscription model, then hopefully you can better manage your support costs by bringing more people current.

    Jim, for what it's worth...
    • The subscription model has allowed Quicken to have a regular cadence of incremental releases, because they are free of the need to hold back new features for a big annual release.
    • I don't know why they're continuing to use calendar years, but the designation now is relatively meaningless. The August update of Quicken 2018 and the September or October Quicken 2019 will just be an incremental update apart. I think they years are to get potential new buyers to know it's a current program, but the year numbers no longer have any real meaning to those on a current subscription.
    • I'm a Mac user, and there have been detailed release notes for every release, major and minor. They're accessible on the Quicken web site and via the Help menu in Quicken. I think the same is true for Windows users now as well. (Click here for all the Windows release notes from the past year of updates.)
    • Getting everyone on a single current release was one of the stated goals of the switch to subscriptions. They stated it would reduce support efforts of having to manage and patch the past three years of versions.
    • I agree with you that a better feedback/bug reporting mechanism would benefit both Quicken and its users. I suspect the problem is that people often scream about a bug in Quicken but don't provide enough information for Quicken to verify and troubleshoot, so they choose to instead drive users to contact their support team, who can either solve the user's problem or escalate bona fide bugs.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018
    Don Awalt said:

    Great progress is being made! One big issue for me- I would love to move from Windows to Mac version, but the current state of the conversion of the data file makes that impossible - I have 15 years of data and I do not want to lose it! Can't you make a conversion utility to move to the Mac, once there is feature parity? It's hardly useful to provide both on the subscription model when you can't move between them. Thanks!

    Don, the conversion from Windows to Mac is actually pretty robust (except, of course, for features which don't yet exist int he Mac version, or can't easily be mapped from one to the other, like custom reports). If there's something specific you've tried snd found doesn't work, it might be worth creating a New Post (and the top of this screen) to see if others can offer help on it.

    Matt, you're right that there is no way to move from Mac to Windows. I don't know why management and the developers have deemed this unimportant to create. I think they assumed that most people who wanted to switch platforms were going from Windows to Mac, not the other way. And they assumed they'd have the Mac version closer to on par with the Windows version in less time than it's (still) taking.

    Brian, the problem with a common file format is that each platform is tightly tied to core technologies in the operating system that don't exist on the other platform. (Like Microsoft's .net framework on Windows and Apple's Core Date on macOS.) It would take re-writing both platforms, largely from scratch, to achieve a platform-agnostic Quicken. There would likely be performance hits from giving up the built-in OS integration, and, oh, have you seen how long it's taking to re-build the Mac version from scratch? ;)
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • JohnJohn Member
    edited July 2018
    I have been a Quicken user for many years but I probably
    will quit when my current version “expires”. It is greed to force an upgrade by
    using the threat of turning off functionality (bank downloads). I am satisfied
    with the current capabilities I have and see no reason for me to upgrade. Good software can be written to continue support
    of legacy versions.  The shift to the
    membership model is the last straw. I do not want or need the “benefits”
    of this model nor do I see value in it when the current version I have meets my
    needs. The membership model is greed and is more for the good of the
    corporation than the customer.  
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018

    I agree with Bob Hollister.  I'm retired and on a mostly fixed income.  I prefer to upgrade when I'm ready, about every 3rd year.  I've been doing this for at least fifteen years.  Give us a choice.  If you do not publish a stand-alone version, I guess I'll have to look elsewhere.

    @rudiedreyer: You used to purchase every third year. With the subscription, you purchase every second year. Yes, the time frame (and cost per year) has changed a little, but not it's not a big change. Why do you feel the need to leave over the semantics of it being a subscription, when the old versions were basically three year subscriptions without using that word?
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018
    John said:

    I have been a Quicken user for many years but I probably
    will quit when my current version “expires”. It is greed to force an upgrade by
    using the threat of turning off functionality (bank downloads). I am satisfied
    with the current capabilities I have and see no reason for me to upgrade. Good software can be written to continue support
    of legacy versions.  The shift to the
    membership model is the last straw. I do not want or need the “benefits”
    of this model nor do I see value in it when the current version I have meets my
    needs. The membership model is greed and is more for the good of the
    corporation than the customer.  

    People expect the software to work continuously without paying for it. But Quicken has to constantly upgrade in order to keep up with changes from the 14,000 financial institutions they connect to. There is a cost to that. If you'd be satisfied using your current program even if your bank connectivity broke, then you're right that you shouldn't need to upgrade -- but most users of course want Quicken to fix connectivity issues so they can keep downloading. That is, largely, what you're paying for, along with the bug fixes and customer support. Whether it's replacing a time-limited version after three years or renewing a subscription every two years is mostly just a seminar difference. (And, to be honest, a price hike.) The subscription/membership thing doesn't constitute greed; it's just a shift of timing really. The embedded price hike is what it is; some may see it as legit for the services Quicken is providing and some may feel it's too expensive.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • BrianBBrianB Member
    edited July 2018
    Don Awalt said:

    Great progress is being made! One big issue for me- I would love to move from Windows to Mac version, but the current state of the conversion of the data file makes that impossible - I have 15 years of data and I do not want to lose it! Can't you make a conversion utility to move to the Mac, once there is feature parity? It's hardly useful to provide both on the subscription model when you can't move between them. Thanks!

    wow - so does word and excel support cross platform files.  Come on it can be done.  You just rewrote the mac version, and who make the decision to not come up with a common file format for both platforms at that time.  I have working on the quicken development in the past, I known the ridiculous decisions made by both the mac and windows teams.  It seem like a pretty straight forward decision to use the more feature rich windows quicken file format and make changes for both products to allow both platforms to use it.  Get over the blah blah about using platform superior technologies.
  • Gary WilliamsGary Williams Member
    edited July 2018
    I became a Quicken user shortly after its inception and have used it ever since, paying for upgrades from time to time that I actually didn't need. (Really, how much can home accounting software realistically be "improved"?) Now, I'm sad to say, I'm being forced to either become a "member" or part ways. ("Member" is code for the unlucky party who gets to pay an annuity to Quicken that only ends with the death of the member.) I'm really pissed about Quicken's new direction and desperately hope a competitor springs up who sees this as an opportunity.
  • GilGil Member
    edited July 2018

    I agree with Bob Hollister.  I'm retired and on a mostly fixed income.  I prefer to upgrade when I'm ready, about every 3rd year.  I've been doing this for at least fifteen years.  Give us a choice.  If you do not publish a stand-alone version, I guess I'll have to look elsewhere.

    The cost has essentially doubled.
  • Joe PJoe P Member
    edited August 2018
    Quicken user for years and I only really had to update the desktop program once every 3 to 4 years. I do not like the fact you moved the program to a SAAS in which now requires an annual or bi-annual payments to maintain our Quicken service.  I have not upgraded and I do expect you will disconnect my service shortly so I have migrated to Intuit Mint which manages all of my finances and bank payments for me automatically with zero dollars per year.
    Now I am willing to come back to Quicken but only if I could upgrade the program when I want to and not have to pay an yearly or every 2 year fee.
    Thanks
  • Dan GlynhamptonDan Glynhampton SuperUser
    edited July 2018

    I became a Quicken user shortly after its inception and have used it ever since, paying for upgrades from time to time that I actually didn't need. (Really, how much can home accounting software realistically be "improved"?) Now, I'm sad to say, I'm being forced to either become a "member" or part ways. ("Member" is code for the unlucky party who gets to pay an annuity to Quicken that only ends with the death of the member.) I'm really pissed about Quicken's new direction and desperately hope a competitor springs up who sees this as an opportunity.

    Quicken has effectively used a "membership model" for some years now. You’ve never owned the software, but rather bought a licence to use the software. That licence gave you about three and a half years of downloading and support from when the product was released, and then if you didn’t purchase a licence for a newer version you could continue to use the software manually.


    From 2018 onwards, the period for which the download and support is available isn’t tied to when the product is released, but rather to when you purchase it. You can buy this "membership" for 12 months directly from Quicken, or for 24 months from retailers like Staples etc. (Amazon have an offer of 27 months currently). When your "membership" expires, you can either renew, or continue to use the product manually as you could in the past (with the exception of the Starter Edition which becomes read only if not renewed).


    The only effective difference that I can see with the new regime is that the cost of using Quicken has changed; depending on how often you upgraded in the past it may be cheaper or more expensive if you wish to continue using the download and support services.


    So if the new pricing structure doesn’t represent value for money to you, then of course you should be looking for alternatives that do provide that value. But otherwise, what’s the difference between you "upgrading" every few years or paying a "membership" every couple of years?
    Currently using US Quicken Deluxe for Windows 2019 R18.15 on Windows 10 v1809
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018

    I agree with Bob Hollister.  I'm retired and on a mostly fixed income.  I prefer to upgrade when I'm ready, about every 3rd year.  I've been doing this for at least fifteen years.  Give us a choice.  If you do not publish a stand-alone version, I guess I'll have to look elsewhere.

    So it isn't about "stand-alone" versus "subscription", right? This issue is that they have raised the price per year for most users, right?

    They apparently decided they needed more money to fund the operations of online connectivity plus expanded customer support plus ongoing updates to the program. Like anything else we choose to buy, or not buy, we each make a value judgment about what something is worth to us, and if we're willing to pay what it costs. If it has become too expensive for what it does for you, then it's time to find an alternative and move on.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018
    Joe P said:

    Quicken user for years and I only really had to update the desktop program once every 3 to 4 years. I do not like the fact you moved the program to a SAAS in which now requires an annual or bi-annual payments to maintain our Quicken service.  I have not upgraded and I do expect you will disconnect my service shortly so I have migrated to Intuit Mint which manages all of my finances and bank payments for me automatically with zero dollars per year.
    Now I am willing to come back to Quicken but only if I could upgrade the program when I want to and not have to pay an yearly or every 2 year fee.
    Thanks

    Joe: So you were okay with paying every third year when online connectivity ended in the past? But you'll walk away because now you have to pay every second year instead? Nothing has really changed, except that time period -- and in the process, the cost per year went up. I understand people don't like paying more per year, but that's really the only change.

    If you've found Mint does everything you want, for free, then it seems like a no-brainer to stick with it. If you've found, as many user shave, that Mint does some of what you want, but not everything that Quicken does, then you have to make a value judgment whether it's worth paying for Quicken or not.

    Editing to add: Quicken is not really SAAS. It is not cloud-based/centrally-hosted software; it is desktop-based as it has always been. 
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Will MoroneyWill Moroney Member
    edited July 2018
    Been a Quicken customer for almost 15 years and the past few years have seen no real improvements. If anything some of the attempts at innovation (like the mobile apps) were a disaster and a step backwards because they were not well thought out and buggy. I’m giving the new team a chance for a year to see what happens but there needs to be a significant focus on better quality more inclusive products. The entire system should move to being cloud based as quickly as possible which willl then enable proper mobile apps.


    Quicken have a large non US client base who pay subscriptions - what is the strategy for us? You take the subscriptions but never mention International customers - are of any interest moving forwards?
  • edited July 2018
    Scott said:

    Mr. Dunn 

    Please apply some quality control and long overdue updates to Lifetime Planner.  IMO, its a vital third leg of the stool:  Expense Mgt,, Investment Mgt,, Retirement (future) Planning

    List of needed fixes and improvements to LTP here:
    https://getsatisfaction.com/quickencommunity/topics/lifetime-planner-bug-and-idea-list-make-yourself...

    I would be more than happy to engage with your Product team on a roadmap, design, development, testing...

    Scott
    2018 QW HBR R10.10

    Agreed.  With all (of course, it would help to add HSAs) the retirement account information already available, Quicken should  be able to provide a first class Lifetime Planner.
  • Rod LetcherRod Letcher Member
    edited July 2018
    I'd be happy if I just had the version I had with my 1st computer, don't recall the version number but it was in 1987. I loved that program. Now, not so much!!!
    Rod
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser
    edited July 2018
    Don Awalt said:

    Great progress is being made! One big issue for me- I would love to move from Windows to Mac version, but the current state of the conversion of the data file makes that impossible - I have 15 years of data and I do not want to lose it! Can't you make a conversion utility to move to the Mac, once there is feature parity? It's hardly useful to provide both on the subscription model when you can't move between them. Thanks!

    Yes, cross-platform file formats definitely can be done. Even with databases (like FileMaker Pro). And Quicken could do it. But they can't do it using the existing Windows or Mac data files. I never said one was superior to the other; I said they were different. They can't just adopt the Windows datafile on the Mac, because Quicken Windows is inextricably ties to Microsoft .net. So they'd need to create a platform-neutral file format and then re-write both the Mac and Windows versions to use the new file format.

    I don't know why such a decision wasn't made at some point in the past, but I suspect it was because there was always so much legacy code involved that it was seen as un-doable or undesirable. And possibly because giving up the database tightly tied to the operating system would adversely impact performance. Or perhaps the cross-platform SQLite database that the new Mac product uses will be the basis for a someday-in-the-future version of Quicken Windows.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • edited July 2018
    I have used quicken for a long time now and used to be able to connect to my chase account for online updates. It has been 2 years now since the login always fails. Any solution to that bank connectivity problem?
  • LarryGLarryG Member
    edited July 2018
    Dump the subscription model!!
  • LarryGLarryG Member
    edited July 2018

    I agree with Bob Hollister.  I'm retired and on a mostly fixed income.  I prefer to upgrade when I'm ready, about every 3rd year.  I've been doing this for at least fifteen years.  Give us a choice.  If you do not publish a stand-alone version, I guess I'll have to look elsewhere.

    Quicken is owned by a private equity company H. I. G. Capital. With a private equity company it's all about the exit strategy.
  • LarryGLarryG Member
    edited July 2018
    John said:

    I have been a Quicken user for many years but I probably
    will quit when my current version “expires”. It is greed to force an upgrade by
    using the threat of turning off functionality (bank downloads). I am satisfied
    with the current capabilities I have and see no reason for me to upgrade. Good software can be written to continue support
    of legacy versions.  The shift to the
    membership model is the last straw. I do not want or need the “benefits”
    of this model nor do I see value in it when the current version I have meets my
    needs. The membership model is greed and is more for the good of the
    corporation than the customer.  

    Quicken is owned by a private equity company H. I. G. Capital. With a private equity company it's all about the exit strategy.
  • LarryGLarryG Member
    edited July 2018

    I became a Quicken user shortly after its inception and have used it ever since, paying for upgrades from time to time that I actually didn't need. (Really, how much can home accounting software realistically be "improved"?) Now, I'm sad to say, I'm being forced to either become a "member" or part ways. ("Member" is code for the unlucky party who gets to pay an annuity to Quicken that only ends with the death of the member.) I'm really pissed about Quicken's new direction and desperately hope a competitor springs up who sees this as an opportunity.

    Quicken is owned by a private equity company H. I. G. Capital. With a private equity company it's all about the exit strategy.
  • LarryGLarryG Member
    edited July 2018

    I have used Quicken for well over 10 years. I only store my data locally, do not access my bank online except for credit cards, and do not use it to manage investments. I am not impressed with the quality of Quicken since 2016 - fonts don't fit and are hard to adjust, and importing transactions results in incorrect category assignments with regularity. When I bother contacting support they are unable to help. Frankly I don't understand the benefit of the subscription service to the end user, as compared to outright purchase. I typically only purchased a new version of Quicken every 3 year.

    Can anyone explain why support isn't better? Or, most importantly, why a subscription service, and how a subscription service benefits me?

    Quicken is owned by a private equity company H. I. G. Capital. With a private equity company it's all about the exit strategy.
  • LarryGLarryG Member
    edited July 2018
    Jim Stone said:

    I don't have a problem w/ the subscription model but what I do ask is that your company simply set a competitive, attractive subscription rate and stick to it, raising or lowering it as needed to KTBR. As you are operating now, you induce customers to wait for the next big discount, or simply wait, as I am, until the version being used no longer works. I'd happy move to the latest version if you did this. As it is, I think I can safely wait until 2020 before I need to upgrade, which may be a risk for me and will defer revenue for you. 

    On a related note, and this is just my opinion, I really like the scrum approach that other subscription services are using: a regular cadence of incremental releases, elimination of the 2018/2019/etc titles, publication of release notes, a more open feedback mechanism, and perhaps dev/beta/stable channels for those users who like to participate. If everyone is truly on the subscription model, then hopefully you can better manage your support costs by bringing more people current.

    Quicken is owned by a private equity company H. I. G. Capital. With a private equity company it's all about the exit strategy.
  • edited July 2018
    I paid for my upgrade at the beginning of the year but I do not believe my Quicken was ever updated. It looks and acts as it always has in the past. You can call me at [personal information removed]. Thank you!
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