Quicken for MAC

The entire program is cumbersome.

After using Quicken for 20+ years I switched to the MAC version.  It seems that the two versions MAC and Windows live and operate in 2 different worlds. When MAC version was developed they certainly didn't learn from what is working well in the Windows world. It is like they started from scratch with a whole new set of thoughts and conventions.

To convert is a miserable and frustrating experience. Nothing works the same and there is far too much manual steps with something that should be more intuitive and user friendly.

Very dissapoinitng!

Comments

  • Dan MacArthurDan MacArthur Member
    edited December 2018
    Agreed Jim, we sed Quicken 2007 for mac for twenty years and have just upgraded for software compatibilty issues. Entering transactions is harder because (at least so far)we have not figured out how to turn off auto entry of a previous transaction to the same payee, and the Reports feature is no where near as customizable as in the older version. If someone at Quicken is reading this, contact us and we will happily show you a Report on 2007 that should be easlly reproduced in 2019. For now we are still using 2007 and will probably ask for our money back....
  • edited November 2018

    Agreed Jim, we sed Quicken 2007 for mac for twenty years and have just upgraded for software compatibilty issues. Entering transactions is harder because (at least so far)we have not figured out how to turn off auto entry of a previous transaction to the same payee, and the Reports feature is no where near as customizable as in the older version. If someone at Quicken is reading this, contact us and we will happily show you a Report on 2007 that should be easlly reproduced in 2019. For now we are still using 2007 and will probably ask for our money back....

    "MAC and Windows live and operate in 2 different worlds".  uh...yah. :-)

    Vive la differance!!  :-)
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2018
    Jim and Dan, there's a lot of history that gets us to where we find ourselves today. The developers are well aware that Quicken Mac does not have all the functionality of Quicken Windows nor the legacy Quicken 2007 for Mac, and they are working to build many of the features users have been asking for. Progress is being made, but the progress is slower than both users, developers and Quicken management would have liked or expected. Why? This is likely way more information than you wanted, but I think if you read though it, you'll gain an understanding of why things are where they are and what the future holds...

    Quicken for Mac was originally developed for the "Classic" Mac operating system of the 1980s and 90s, and when Apple switched to the Unix-based Mac OS X in 2001, developers were aware that while Apple aimed to maintain compatibility as long as possible, eventually the underpinnings of old Mac OS would be retired and programs would have to be re-written for the new operating system. After the release of Quicken 2007, the developers at Intuit realized that so much of the code of Quicken was inexorably tied to things in the old OS, there was no viable alternative except starting over to build a new Quicken Mac using the more modern tools, database, graphics and frameworks of Mac OS X.

    So starting in late 2006, that's what they aimed to do. It was a very big project, since Quicken 2007 was the culmination of nearly 20 year of code development. The team working on the new version didn't set out to create a look-alike of Quicken 2007, but to re-think the features and design of a program that had originally been developed when everyone had 12" monitors. The project was called Quicken Financial Life, and after two years of development, it never made it out of beta testing. During this development cycle, Mint.com was born -- a web-based financial management tool which looked clean and colorful and was easy to use. Recognizing the threat to Quicken's market dominance, Intuit purchased Mint in 2009, and installed its founder, Aaron Patzer, as the head of the Quicken division. He quickly revamped the stalled Quicken Mac project to make its user interface more like Mint, with colorful charts and graphs -- but there was still a huge amount of functionality missing. He decided to release an underpowered subset of Quicken, called Quicken Essentials, in early 2010. It didn't track investments, had rudimentary reporting, and lacked a great deal of other functionality from the legacy Quicken -- but it was something they could put on the market while they continued development. He promised Mac users a full-fledged Quicken Deluxe would follow the next year. It was not to be. Reviews and users disliked Quicken Essentials because of its limited features, so many users continued using Quicken 2007, and Intuit continued not bringing in much revenue from its Mac product. Intuit then underwent another management shake-up, with Patzer leaving the Quicken division, and the Mac project completely stalled.

    It wasn't until late 2012 that Intuit hired a new product manager, Marcus Aiu, to pick up the pieces of the Quicken Mac development project. With only a handful of developers on the team, they needed to revamp some of the core code in Essentials to conform to changes in the Mac operating system, and then to develop the missing investment tracking functionality. After two years of development, in August 2014, the modern Quicken Mac came to market as Quicken 2015. Most of the people who beta tested that product argued that more features and fixes were needed before the product was released. Marcus explained that this essentially was a minimal viable product that they planned to rapidly iterate with user feedback. They felt it was a long-needed enhancement for users of the ill-fated Quicken Essentials product, but knew it didn't yet have the functionality to meet the needs of many longtime Quicken Mac users or Quicken Windows users.

    Marcus posted this simple explanation shortly after Quicken 2015 was first released, something I wish the company would have displayed more prominently: "I don't expect many Quicken 2007 or Quicken Windows users to purchase the product until it has the features they need. The bottom line is: we released what we felt was a great release [upgrade] for Quicken Essentials users, and the plan is to continue to enhance the product adding legacy features that appear in other versions of Quicken throughout the year."

    They've made a lot of progress since then, and added many major and minor features users have clamored for. But they thought they'd make much faster progress in adding features; they lost a lot of time re-writing code for changing Internet communications protocols, changing servers at Intuit, and eventually moving off some of Intuit's servers after Quicken separated from Intuit. At the time Quicken became an independent company in 2016, the CEO stated that Quicken Mac feature parity with Quicken Windows is a goal. (Cynics will note that Quicken Windows has its own share of problems that Quicken Mac ought not to emulate!) They also announced they were doubling the size of the Mac development team to build new functionality more quickly.

    So where does that leave us in late 2018? I would argue that for all the shortcomings in Quicken Mac 2019, things seem headed in the right direction -- but the path is going to continue to be one of slow progress with bumps along the way. Quicken 2019 is vastly improved over the original Quicken 2015 four years ago, and even over Quicken 2017 two years ago. The developers don't pre-announce features, so we don't know exactly what it coming or when -- but they have hinted at some long-desired improvements coming in the not too distant future, including continued work on bringing powerful, flexible reports to replace the lame reports that still exist from Essentials 8 years ago; user control over payee matching and transaction auto-categorization; and user control over including account transfers in budgets.

    Sorry if that was too long, but to me, the recounting of the entire tortured, twisted history helps me have some perspective and understanding of why things aren't at the level we'd yet like, and also judge the quality and pace of development over the past number of years. It's going to take another year or two, or more, to add many of the features that users are waiting for, but all indications are that they are headed in the right direction.

    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2018
    @Dan, one quick tip that might help with entering transactions, if you're not aware of it. As you note, when you start to enter a Payee, Quicken calls up t last transaction for the same Payee. Sometime this is helpful, but sometimes not. There's an easy way to defeat the auto-load of the previous transaction though: enter the Payee, but instead of pressing Tab, press Option-Tab to advance past the Payee field. Option-Tab retains the Payee name, but does not load any of the data from a  previous transaction.

    (This is incredibly helpful if you're entering transactions manually; it doesn't help if you're downloading transactions from a bank or credit card company and are having problems with Payee names; for help with that, we need to wait until they add the capability to create/edit renaming rules.)
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Jim KenworthyJim Kenworthy Member
    edited November 2018
    jacobs, thank you for your thorough reply. I certainly appreciate all that is being put into updates for the MAC app.  I am not wanting an exact replica because the Windows version has its own set of problems.  Nonetheless there are very simple changes that could save time.  For example, every time I download a transaction, the register acts like it has never heard of or seen the payee. I have routine and reoccurring transactions but Quicken treats them as unrecognized/unknown transactions every month.  I have to manually edit. The Windows version has no problems handling these transaction correctly.  
    When editing these reoccurring transactions, I have to highlight the transaction, then right click to edit.  Why not allow me to edit when I simply highlight the line.
    Another irritant is when I need to change the dollar amount on a memorized payee. The program needs to highlight in blue the current dollar amount not just put the cursor where my mouse arrow happens to be.
    These are the simple things that make this version of Quicken very cumbersome. Many other examples.
    Again, I did appreciate you detailed explanation.
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2018
    Jim: if I'm understanding the irritation you're describing, there is a simple solution. To edit a transaction, instead of clicking it to highlight, then right-clicking and selecting Edit, simply double-click on the transaction -- that will open it for editing in one step. If you double-click on a transaction that contains a split, it will also open the split at the same time, so it's not a multi-step process to edit. Once a transaction is in edit mode, to edit a dollar amount, you can either click to put your cursor wherever you want in the amount field, select one or more digits to delete or overtype, or double-click in the amount field to select the entire amount so you can type a new value (e.g. if the amount field is showing 1234.56, and you need to change it to 2345.67, just double-click in the amount field and type the new value).
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • Jim KenworthyJim Kenworthy Member
    edited November 2018
    Jacobs, Again thank you very much for your tips.  They work and help immensely.

    I hope you don't mind if I keep asking additional questions.  How do I find and edit "memorized payee" list? How do I get the register to remember the category for a payee?  When the transaction is downloaded, it usually categorize the transaction as "uncategorized" yet when I edit the category the very next selection listed is the way that payee has been categorized a 100 time previously.  Something is connecting right.

    Thanks again,
  • DerekDerek Member
    edited November 2018
    jacobs said:

    Jim and Dan, there's a lot of history that gets us to where we find ourselves today. The developers are well aware that Quicken Mac does not have all the functionality of Quicken Windows nor the legacy Quicken 2007 for Mac, and they are working to build many of the features users have been asking for. Progress is being made, but the progress is slower than both users, developers and Quicken management would have liked or expected. Why? This is likely way more information than you wanted, but I think if you read though it, you'll gain an understanding of why things are where they are and what the future holds...

    Quicken for Mac was originally developed for the "Classic" Mac operating system of the 1980s and 90s, and when Apple switched to the Unix-based Mac OS X in 2001, developers were aware that while Apple aimed to maintain compatibility as long as possible, eventually the underpinnings of old Mac OS would be retired and programs would have to be re-written for the new operating system. After the release of Quicken 2007, the developers at Intuit realized that so much of the code of Quicken was inexorably tied to things in the old OS, there was no viable alternative except starting over to build a new Quicken Mac using the more modern tools, database, graphics and frameworks of Mac OS X.

    So starting in late 2006, that's what they aimed to do. It was a very big project, since Quicken 2007 was the culmination of nearly 20 year of code development. The team working on the new version didn't set out to create a look-alike of Quicken 2007, but to re-think the features and design of a program that had originally been developed when everyone had 12" monitors. The project was called Quicken Financial Life, and after two years of development, it never made it out of beta testing. During this development cycle, Mint.com was born -- a web-based financial management tool which looked clean and colorful and was easy to use. Recognizing the threat to Quicken's market dominance, Intuit purchased Mint in 2009, and installed its founder, Aaron Patzer, as the head of the Quicken division. He quickly revamped the stalled Quicken Mac project to make its user interface more like Mint, with colorful charts and graphs -- but there was still a huge amount of functionality missing. He decided to release an underpowered subset of Quicken, called Quicken Essentials, in early 2010. It didn't track investments, had rudimentary reporting, and lacked a great deal of other functionality from the legacy Quicken -- but it was something they could put on the market while they continued development. He promised Mac users a full-fledged Quicken Deluxe would follow the next year. It was not to be. Reviews and users disliked Quicken Essentials because of its limited features, so many users continued using Quicken 2007, and Intuit continued not bringing in much revenue from its Mac product. Intuit then underwent another management shake-up, with Patzer leaving the Quicken division, and the Mac project completely stalled.

    It wasn't until late 2012 that Intuit hired a new product manager, Marcus Aiu, to pick up the pieces of the Quicken Mac development project. With only a handful of developers on the team, they needed to revamp some of the core code in Essentials to conform to changes in the Mac operating system, and then to develop the missing investment tracking functionality. After two years of development, in August 2014, the modern Quicken Mac came to market as Quicken 2015. Most of the people who beta tested that product argued that more features and fixes were needed before the product was released. Marcus explained that this essentially was a minimal viable product that they planned to rapidly iterate with user feedback. They felt it was a long-needed enhancement for users of the ill-fated Quicken Essentials product, but knew it didn't yet have the functionality to meet the needs of many longtime Quicken Mac users or Quicken Windows users.

    Marcus posted this simple explanation shortly after Quicken 2015 was first released, something I wish the company would have displayed more prominently: "I don't expect many Quicken 2007 or Quicken Windows users to purchase the product until it has the features they need. The bottom line is: we released what we felt was a great release [upgrade] for Quicken Essentials users, and the plan is to continue to enhance the product adding legacy features that appear in other versions of Quicken throughout the year."

    They've made a lot of progress since then, and added many major and minor features users have clamored for. But they thought they'd make much faster progress in adding features; they lost a lot of time re-writing code for changing Internet communications protocols, changing servers at Intuit, and eventually moving off some of Intuit's servers after Quicken separated from Intuit. At the time Quicken became an independent company in 2016, the CEO stated that Quicken Mac feature parity with Quicken Windows is a goal. (Cynics will note that Quicken Windows has its own share of problems that Quicken Mac ought not to emulate!) They also announced they were doubling the size of the Mac development team to build new functionality more quickly.

    So where does that leave us in late 2018? I would argue that for all the shortcomings in Quicken Mac 2019, things seem headed in the right direction -- but the path is going to continue to be one of slow progress with bumps along the way. Quicken 2019 is vastly improved over the original Quicken 2015 four years ago, and even over Quicken 2017 two years ago. The developers don't pre-announce features, so we don't know exactly what it coming or when -- but they have hinted at some long-desired improvements coming in the not too distant future, including continued work on bringing powerful, flexible reports to replace the lame reports that still exist from Essentials 8 years ago; user control over payee matching and transaction auto-categorization; and user control over including account transfers in budgets.

    Sorry if that was too long, but to me, the recounting of the entire tortured, twisted history helps me have some perspective and understanding of why things aren't at the level we'd yet like, and also judge the quality and pace of development over the past number of years. It's going to take another year or two, or more, to add many of the features that users are waiting for, but all indications are that they are headed in the right direction.

    I appreciate having this background. I have stuck with Quicken since 2007 and at times it has been challenging. However, the fact is there really is not a viable alternate in the Mac world. (Don't mention iBank to me.... lol)
    For all its issues, your team has delivered a product that Mac users need. Keep pushing on, software development is a complex task.
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