Quicken for Chrome OS (9 Legacy Votes)

Chrome OS is growing faster than most people realize. As far as I can tell, there is no Quicken like application (including reconciliation) available for this platform. I don't need the ability to import transactions from my bank but most people would probably require that. MINT is not an acceptable alternative as it does not reconcile. 
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  • smayer97smayer97 SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2018
    Does the Android version of Quicken Mobile not work or are you asking about a full-featured version like the desktop versions?

    If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.

    (Canadian  user since '92, STILL using QM2007)

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  • BillBill Member
    edited October 2018
    Desire a version of Quicken that would run on a ChromeBook or ChromeBox? It doesn't need to download financial info from a bank or other financial institution. I'm not interested in a version that runs on a phone. An alternative is QuickBooks-Web but that is pricey and somewhat complex for someone who just wants to manage their bank accounts. 
  • QPWQPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2017
    Bill said:

    Desire a version of Quicken that would run on a ChromeBook or ChromeBox? It doesn't need to download financial info from a bank or other financial institution. I'm not interested in a version that runs on a phone. An alternative is QuickBooks-Web but that is pricey and somewhat complex for someone who just wants to manage their bank accounts. 

    I don't think this will ever happen.  It would mean total rewrite of Quicken for that operating system.

    Didn't Chrome OS get the ability to run Android programs?
    If so then your best chance might actually be some other application that runs on Android.
  • splashersplasher SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2017
    Bill said:

    Desire a version of Quicken that would run on a ChromeBook or ChromeBox? It doesn't need to download financial info from a bank or other financial institution. I'm not interested in a version that runs on a phone. An alternative is QuickBooks-Web but that is pricey and somewhat complex for someone who just wants to manage their bank accounts. 

    To get what you want and if my understanding the Chrome OS programs is correct, Quicken would have to write a versioin of Quicken from the ground up that is cloud based.

    They are still working on getting the Mac version up to parity with the Windows version and then there are the Linux users that want one for them.  You are the end of a very long line.
    -splasher  using Q since 1996 -  QW2016, 2017 & Subscription  -  Win7/Win10
    -Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list

  • Joe JJoe J Member
    edited October 2018
    I am curious why you need to reconcile.  I have been trying Mint over the last few weeks after being a long time Quicken user.  I too was reluctant to switch due to the reconciliation issue.  But having worked with it a bit, there really is no need to reconcile.  You can put in checks if you wish that will be matched and cleared from the "pending" section when they clear. Otherwise for me, the only point to reconciling was to catch something that was not supposed to be there (i.e. errors or fraud), but a quick review of the transactions listed in Mint takes care of that concern.  Of course, if you have a large volume of transactions I can see your point, but if that is the case you really should be on Quickbooks or another system.
  • QPWQPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Joe J said:

    I am curious why you need to reconcile.  I have been trying Mint over the last few weeks after being a long time Quicken user.  I too was reluctant to switch due to the reconciliation issue.  But having worked with it a bit, there really is no need to reconcile.  You can put in checks if you wish that will be matched and cleared from the "pending" section when they clear. Otherwise for me, the only point to reconciling was to catch something that was not supposed to be there (i.e. errors or fraud), but a quick review of the transactions listed in Mint takes care of that concern.  Of course, if you have a large volume of transactions I can see your point, but if that is the case you really should be on Quickbooks or another system.

    Personally I think Joe J has a very good point, provided you can trust Mint to do the downloading correctly.

    In all of my years of tracking my finances I think I only remember one small transaction that I thought the financial institution was in error (something like 25 years ago).  And I'm not even to sure of that one.

    So in reality reconciling for me has always been about making sure what I was seeing Quicken actually reflects what the financial institution says.  And if it doesn't I needed to fix something in Quicken.

    If you can get an accurate download of your financial institution's information (or better yet just get it from them), then I don't really see a need for reconciling.
  • Joe JJoe J Member
    edited November 2017
    Joe J said:

    I am curious why you need to reconcile.  I have been trying Mint over the last few weeks after being a long time Quicken user.  I too was reluctant to switch due to the reconciliation issue.  But having worked with it a bit, there really is no need to reconcile.  You can put in checks if you wish that will be matched and cleared from the "pending" section when they clear. Otherwise for me, the only point to reconciling was to catch something that was not supposed to be there (i.e. errors or fraud), but a quick review of the transactions listed in Mint takes care of that concern.  Of course, if you have a large volume of transactions I can see your point, but if that is the case you really should be on Quickbooks or another system.

    Thanks QPW.  I would go further to ask can you even "trust" Quicken not drop transactions?  If you read the posts here, that is not always a certainty.  In my mind it would easy enough, if you had doubts, to do a data spinoff of a bank/credit account for a given statement date range and agree the totals of the data to the statement. As I said, I am new to trying Mint.  I probably would sum up the difference best as seeing Quicken as a "light" accounting system where Mint is a transaction tracking system (with current account balances and asset valuation).
  • QPWQPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Joe J said:

    I am curious why you need to reconcile.  I have been trying Mint over the last few weeks after being a long time Quicken user.  I too was reluctant to switch due to the reconciliation issue.  But having worked with it a bit, there really is no need to reconcile.  You can put in checks if you wish that will be matched and cleared from the "pending" section when they clear. Otherwise for me, the only point to reconciling was to catch something that was not supposed to be there (i.e. errors or fraud), but a quick review of the transactions listed in Mint takes care of that concern.  Of course, if you have a large volume of transactions I can see your point, but if that is the case you really should be on Quickbooks or another system.

    My statement about making sure Quicken reflects what the financial institution says encompasses quite a big area.

    For novice Quicken users some of that is not knowing how properly use Quicken.

    For others there are problems with Express Web Connect or a given financial institution.
    In the area of investing even the best financial institutions sometimes miss code the information downloaded.

    Not to mention that there are some that don't even provide a way to download.

    You can't blindly accept what is downloaded and believe that you are going to have an accurate record of your finances.

    And on top of all of that there are the bugs in Quicken where the user has to know the workarounds.  This last part is why when asked on the Quicken surveys if I would recommend it to a friend I always put in, only if I believe that they will spend a long time learning how to properly use it.

    Quicken is a great program for seeing everything in one place, but it is far from the "In 5 minutes you will see all of your finances in one place" marketing talk.

    And also when the novice sees marketing talk like that they make the false assumption that the information is "real time".  Even Mint isn't that.

    For the people that are checking their credit card balance to see if they can buy that new trinket, they should be using the financial institution's mobile app or website.
  • BillBill Member
    edited November 2017
    Bill said:

    Desire a version of Quicken that would run on a ChromeBook or ChromeBox? It doesn't need to download financial info from a bank or other financial institution. I'm not interested in a version that runs on a phone. An alternative is QuickBooks-Web but that is pricey and somewhat complex for someone who just wants to manage their bank accounts. 

    Cloud based applications are in rapid growth while local applications are in decline. Quicken is pursuing a "going out of business" strategy especially developing for the Mac with its infinitesimal market share. 
  • QPWQPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Bill said:

    Desire a version of Quicken that would run on a ChromeBook or ChromeBox? It doesn't need to download financial info from a bank or other financial institution. I'm not interested in a version that runs on a phone. An alternative is QuickBooks-Web but that is pricey and somewhat complex for someone who just wants to manage their bank accounts. 

    Bill in a way I agree with you for the "long term".  But I believe the "long term" is quite a few years off.  And in fact by the time we get there, who knows what will be the norm?

    "Cloud based applications" are nothing new.  In fact they use to be the "norm" before personal computers came around.  People used terminals.  You can't get any more "cloud based" than that.

    BUT for Quicken Inc it is pointless to talk about this in my opinion.

    Quicken isn't magic.  There isn't anything in it that another company can't do themselves.

    So what "advantage" does Quicken Inc have over a competitor?

    Quicken has a LOT of features.  It takes a LOT of time to reproduce these features (just look at the Quicken Mac rewrite to see an example, YEARS of work and still not equal to the Windows Deluxe version.)

    Doing a "Cloud based Quicken" would mean a total rewrite of Quicken, especially if they were to support other operating systems like ChromeOS.

    So given that what advantages would they have over say Mint or Prosperity Finance?

    Basically none.  In fact they would be at a disadvantage because those are already server based applications with a good part of what is needed done.

    So yes Quicken Inc is looking at a declining market in my opinion, but it is really all they have.
  • cuddzujrcuddzujr Member
    edited March 2018
    Looks like Quicken on Chrome is now possible.

    https://www.codeweavers.com/products/crossover-chromeos
  • Paul ReruchaPaul Rerucha Member
    edited June 2018
    Bill said:

    Desire a version of Quicken that would run on a ChromeBook or ChromeBox? It doesn't need to download financial info from a bank or other financial institution. I'm not interested in a version that runs on a phone. An alternative is QuickBooks-Web but that is pricey and somewhat complex for someone who just wants to manage their bank accounts. 

    You can run Microsoft apps including Quicken on your chromebook: check out this link https://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to-run-windows-apps-on-your-chromebook/
  • BillBill Member
    edited September 2018
    Joe J said:

    I am curious why you need to reconcile.  I have been trying Mint over the last few weeks after being a long time Quicken user.  I too was reluctant to switch due to the reconciliation issue.  But having worked with it a bit, there really is no need to reconcile.  You can put in checks if you wish that will be matched and cleared from the "pending" section when they clear. Otherwise for me, the only point to reconciling was to catch something that was not supposed to be there (i.e. errors or fraud), but a quick review of the transactions listed in Mint takes care of that concern.  Of course, if you have a large volume of transactions I can see your point, but if that is the case you really should be on Quickbooks or another system.

    Yeah right. I'm going to give my bank account numbers and passwords to Mint. Why not just publish them on Facebook or Twitter? 
  • BillBill Member
    edited November 2018
    I've switched from Quicken to MoneyDance which is written in JAVA. With full Android support coming to ChromeOS, that hopefully will include JAVA support. The reconciliation built into MoneyDance is rather primitive but better than nothing. 
  • jtpryanjtpryan Member
    edited September 2018
    Joe J said:

    I am curious why you need to reconcile.  I have been trying Mint over the last few weeks after being a long time Quicken user.  I too was reluctant to switch due to the reconciliation issue.  But having worked with it a bit, there really is no need to reconcile.  You can put in checks if you wish that will be matched and cleared from the "pending" section when they clear. Otherwise for me, the only point to reconciling was to catch something that was not supposed to be there (i.e. errors or fraud), but a quick review of the transactions listed in Mint takes care of that concern.  Of course, if you have a large volume of transactions I can see your point, but if that is the case you really should be on Quickbooks or another system.

    Bill,

    Because Quicken is a banking application with the necessary privacy considerations put into place just like going to your bank.  Facebook and Twitter are social platforms that are built to share what you put on them publicly, for better or for worse.  There is no comparison here. 
  • joe lavalleejoe lavallee Member
    edited November 2018
    This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled So many of us are using Chromebooks, when will Quicken be available for use on th....


    Quicken for Chromebooks
  • wjh611wjh611 Member
    edited January 3
    This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Chromebook and Quicken.


    Chromebook computers are getting more popular.  When will Quicken be available for Chromebook?  Or web-based?
  • jacobsjacobs SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 3
    This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Moving to merge.


    That's not the direction Quicken seems to be moving in, although of course we don't know the company's long-term plans. Just recently, Quicken came out with a web-based interface that lets you access some (but not all) your financial data if you choose to store it in the cloud. But it still requires a PC or Mac for your primary data file that the cloud service syncs to.

    There are a significant number of Quicken users who don't want all their financial data, including the passwords to their accounts, stored online. Although Quicken has never suffered a significant data breach, it's happened to so many top-line companies that a lot of users want to keep all their data on a local computer and not in the cloud.

    Making a version of Quicken that works solely in the cloud and has the functionality of Windows or Mac desktop versions would require a massive effort to re-write Quicken, which is engineered for a single user on a local desktop. Also, they'd be going up against existing web-based products like Mint, which are free, and I'm not sure Quicken would be able to command their premium pricing for a web-based product that offers a little more than Mint.

    I'm not saying it can't or won't happen, but for the reasons above and Quicken's recent moves, it doesn't seem like a fully web-based version is coming soon.

    Note: This conversation was created from a reply on: Chromebook and Quicken.
    QMac 2007 & QMac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • wjh611wjh611 Member
    edited January 3
    This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Merging.


    Thanks for your clear reply, but I don't like what Quicken is doing, so I can't select "Like".

    Note: This conversation was created from a reply on: Moving to merge.
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