Quicken on Linux by 2020 for Those Rejecting Windows 10

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  • ChicagoDan3ChicagoDan3 Member
    edited October 2018
    QPW said:

    Frankly the only way I think you will ever see Quicken on Linux without running a virtual machine is using wine.  And there are several problems around running wine (as in wine keeping up with all the changes/installs made to Quicken).

    I wonder if Quicken is going to try to get away from desktop software anyways and the sync to mobile/web will become the way we upload our local dbs.  Seems like its a lot easier to find web developers these days and given all the efficiencies of running a website Quicken will naturally want to spend most of its time and effort on the web site.  Not to mention people seem to prefer websites these days.
  • QPWQPW ✭✭✭✭ Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018
    QPW said:

    Frankly the only way I think you will ever see Quicken on Linux without running a virtual machine is using wine.  And there are several problems around running wine (as in wine keeping up with all the changes/installs made to Quicken).

    I certainly think that Quicken Inc is going to "build out" the Quicken Cloud versions (Mobile App and Web), but you have to keep things in perspective.

    Developing for the web and mobile apps isn't going to go any faster (and maybe slower) than development for Desktop software.  So far the Quicken Mac rewrite has taken about 11 years (or "continuous work" of about 6 or more years) and has yet reached feature parity with Quicken 2007 Mac let alone Quicken subscriptions Deluxe Windows.

    There is a TON of work they would have to do to make it independent of the Desktop version at this point.
  • PlazmaPlazma Member
    edited December 2018
    QPW said:

    Frankly the only way I think you will ever see Quicken on Linux without running a virtual machine is using wine.  And there are several problems around running wine (as in wine keeping up with all the changes/installs made to Quicken).

    I came here to request Quicken on Ubuntu and it seems this is already a popular request. +1 for Linux support.
  • John ErvinJohn Ervin Member
    edited December 2018
    QPW said:

    Frankly the only way I think you will ever see Quicken on Linux without running a virtual machine is using wine.  And there are several problems around running wine (as in wine keeping up with all the changes/installs made to Quicken).

    Me too, althought it works pretty well on Ubuntu with Crossover.  Much faster than virtualbox.
  • Ronald LewisRonald Lewis Member
    edited December 2018
    I depend on Quicken for my personal finances. Until Quicken is released for Linux, I am committed to using a stand alone, island machine Windows 10 machine for my financial records. I do not buy into the Cloud version idea as a friend, an accountant, who uses QuickBooks on the cloud says it is much slower and more difficult.
  • BrentBrent Member ✭✭
    edited January 10
    I too would love to have a Linux version of Quicken, however, I am not holding my breath.  I believe that they will build out the online version before committing resources to a Linux port.  From my experience, they certainly have a lot of work to do to stabilize the online version.
  • Greg_the_GeekGreg_the_Geek ✭✭✭✭✭ SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 10
    Are you calling Quicken on the Web an "online version"? 
    Quicken 2017 H&B - Windows 10
  • edited August 14

    I too would love to have a Linux version of Quicken, however, I am not holding my breath.  I believe that they will build out the online version before committing resources to a Linux port.  From my experience, they certainly have a lot of work to do to stabilize the online version.


    I know we cannot change Microsoft’s vision of what we want, ie,
    THEY know better than we do, but here is an idea vis-à-vis Quicken.
    I remember when Quicken first came out it ran on DOS, not Windows.
    While it was not very sophisticated, it had a HUGE advantage over
    everything else on the market – it was almost completely bug free.
    Before abandoning Quicken for DOS, there were several versions and
    possibly the most recent would not be too difficult to modify for
    Linux Terminal. There would be no bank or stock downloads (initially)
    but the actual managing of personal expenditures would be available
    and much less temperamental than [removed].






  • John ErvinJohn Ervin Member
    edited January 16
    I am able to run the current Quicken on my Ubuntu/Linux system using Crossover.  Seems to work fine, am able to use it to contact my bank and investment companies.  Crossover is not-free software built on wine.  I was never able to get Quicken to install using straight wine.  Let us know if you figure out how to install using the free version of Wine.
  • Dan HowardDan Howard Member
    edited August 14
    [removed  is not quite as polished as Quicken, but it does have Windows, Mac and Linux versions (plus a mobile  app)... [removed]

     Right now it supports "Direct Connect" (only) to financial institutions, but can also accept QFX downloads/import. The upcoming 2019 beta reportedly has the underpinnings for what will be the functional equivalent of the Quicken-proprietary "Web Connect" to download from institutions that don't support Direct Connect.

    Some time ago I imported my Quicken data into [removed] (Quicken has reportedly recently "broken" the ability to export data in the .QIF format which [removed] uses to import existing data). I now maintain all of my data in both Quicken and [removed], looking forward to the day when [removed] fully replicates the functionality I use in Quicken and I can use [removed] exclusively [removed]
  • John ErvinJohn Ervin Member
    edited January 17
    That's my problem, I use Quicken about half for personal finance and investments and about half for a small business that I run.  Requires creating and keeping track of invoices.  I did get Quicken running on Ubuntu using Crossover by CodeWeavers (built on wine), but I expect that the Quicken folks will find a way of breaking that eventually.

  • NotACPANotACPA ✭✭✭✭✭ SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 17
    Well, let's analyze the results of this thread, as a Poll.

    The thread has been up for 2 years ... and has gotten exactly 12 favorable votes.

    By contrast, a prior thread about Q received over 300 votes in the 1st week.

    I don't think that this "Linux by 2020" idea is going to fly.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription,  Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • Bill TucciBill Tucci Member
    edited January 17
    Two years ago, when I started this thread, I was hoping that the dissatisfaction with Win 10 would finally get enough people to look at Linux desktop to make it a worthwhile market.  While 39% of Windows users are still on Win 7, I have a bad feeling that most of those are corporate machines that will be upgraded/replaced with Win 10 over the next year.  In looking at how many people are like myself and are NOT on Facebook compared to the 2.5 BILLION who are, I guess that viewing privacy as important is just so 20th Century (and George Orwell was only a handful of decades off in predicting Big Brother).  The recent problems MS has had in releasing updates and upgrades that don't trash your Windows machine should also give people pause, but it won't.

    Maybe sometime next year I'll find that I was correct, and that the desktop Linux market matches OS X in size.  But until that happens, I don't see Quicken spending the resources to develop Linux Quicken.  (And even if I'm right, given the Linux community's bias against paid proprietary software, there still may not be enough of a market.)
  • I have been using mac since OS8. My mid-2011 iMac is no longer supported by MacOS, but has good hardware specs. Mac is also becoming bloated. I've been dealing with very lightweight Linux systems lately. Next computer will be generic x86 pc components running Linux. Been programming components for a multiplatform sfml app lately. Using a multiplatform framework could be a good choice to reach people on different platforms without the need for separate branches. Web based solutions is good too. Excited to start using quicken on my mac. Was thinking about Linux and saw this thread.
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