File conversion

I just converted to Q2020 and all the Q2007 files only go back to the year 2016! Seems like there might be multiple data files on the laptop. I double-clicked on the most recent ones after doing a reconcile before doing the conversion, so I know they're the most recent ones. How do I de-install and how to get the correct data files? Mac Capital 10.11.6

Best Answer

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    @danwriter  You wrote "Mac Capital 10.11.6" -- am I correct in assuming this was an auto-spelling typo and you meant to write that you're using macOS El Capitan 10.11.6?

    If so, that's potentially the first problem, as the current Quicken Mac (6.0.3) does not support El Capitan. Starting with version 6, macOS High Sierra (10.13) is the minimum system requirement for Quicken Mac. Are you running the previous version: Quicken Mac 5.18.2? 

    In terms of converting Quicken 2007 files, each one converts to a different Quicken 2020 data file if you do it correctly: go to File > New, and on the Getting started page, select Start from a Quicken 2007 file. This creates a new Quicken 2020 data file from the selected Quicken 2007 data file. (Do NOT try to to do File > Import, or you will find yourself adding transactions to the file you previously converted, and likely a have a mess.)

    In Quicken 2007, open the Accounts window; the heading of that window will display the name of your current Quicken file. Make sure you locate the file of the exact same name, and then do File > New to convert it.

    Actually, while you have the file open in Quicken 2007, do one preventative maintenance task: press Command-Option-B to force it to rebuild its indexes. Then quit Quicken 2007 and try converting the data file to Quicken 2020. (When Quicken 2007's indexes get messed up, all sorts fo strange behavior can result!)
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993

Answers

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    @danwriter  You wrote "Mac Capital 10.11.6" -- am I correct in assuming this was an auto-spelling typo and you meant to write that you're using macOS El Capitan 10.11.6?

    If so, that's potentially the first problem, as the current Quicken Mac (6.0.3) does not support El Capitan. Starting with version 6, macOS High Sierra (10.13) is the minimum system requirement for Quicken Mac. Are you running the previous version: Quicken Mac 5.18.2? 

    In terms of converting Quicken 2007 files, each one converts to a different Quicken 2020 data file if you do it correctly: go to File > New, and on the Getting started page, select Start from a Quicken 2007 file. This creates a new Quicken 2020 data file from the selected Quicken 2007 data file. (Do NOT try to to do File > Import, or you will find yourself adding transactions to the file you previously converted, and likely a have a mess.)

    In Quicken 2007, open the Accounts window; the heading of that window will display the name of your current Quicken file. Make sure you locate the file of the exact same name, and then do File > New to convert it.

    Actually, while you have the file open in Quicken 2007, do one preventative maintenance task: press Command-Option-B to force it to rebuild its indexes. Then quit Quicken 2007 and try converting the data file to Quicken 2020. (When Quicken 2007's indexes get messed up, all sorts fo strange behavior can result!)
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • danwriter
    danwriter Member ✭✭
    Yes, El Capitan 10.11.6. I thought that might be one of the problems.

    I do have new MacBook Air I'm getting ready to transition to, running I'm sure the most recent OS. I was hoping to get Q2020 running on the old one and then migrate all of that over to the new Mac (because I'm sure other apps, like my current version of Word, will not survive the jump either), but I guess I'll do the data migration first and then activate Q2020. I'll try your instructions once I do that. Thanks and happy new year.
  • danwriter
    danwriter Member ✭✭
    Jacobs: I've finished the migration from Quicken 207 (v. 16.1.4), which had been running on a Mac OS (El Capitan v. 10.11.6), to a Mac running Big Sur (v. 11.0). The old Quicken files came over, as (old yellow logo) 11 Quicken Data.qdfm and another file (new red logo) called 11 2016.quicken. Both open with the newest data dating back only to 2016. I've already learned that the old files are 16 bit and the new ones are 32 bit. So, will I be able to rescue these via your instructions?

    "In terms of converting Quicken 2007 files, each one converts to a different Quicken 2020 data file if you do it correctly: go to File > New, and on the Getting started page, select Start from a Quicken 2007 file."

    Thanks.
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    You're mixing up a few things.

    Quicken 2007 and other programs of that era are 32-bit applications. (This has to do with how much memory they can address, but the technical details are unimportant.) Starting with macOS Catalina last year, Apple made the operating system only support newer 64-bit applications. the modern Quicken Mac is 64-bit, so it can run on Catalina and Big Sur; the old Quicken 2007 is 32-bit, so it can't. 

    The Quicken data files themselves aren't 32- or 64-bit.

    I don't know if you still have access to your old Mac; if so it would help to open Quicken 2007 on that machine, open the Accounts window, and look at the title bar of the window: it will show you the name of the file Quicken 2007 is using. For instance, here it's showing my file is "Jacobs Bookkeeping.qdfm":



    Why does this matter? Because if the file you opened on your new Mac only has data through 2016, it means that's not your current data file. So it's imperative to find out the name of your most recent Quicken 2007 data file, and to find that file on the old Mac, or perhaps on the new Mac depending what was transferred over. It will definitely be a .qdfm file you're looking for. (Quicken 2007 data files used the .qdfm extension; modern Quicken Mac uses the .quicken extension.)

    Since you have a .quicken file, it means you already launched the new Quicken on your new Mac, and in one way or another, converted a Quicken 2007 data file. But from what you're saying, the file which converted is not the correct file; it's an older file you had on your old Mac. It's not what you want. The quest is to locate your most recent Quicken 2007 data file to convert.

    Assuming you can locate the correct Quicken 2007 data file, then go ahead and follow my previous instructions: go to File > New, and on the Getting started page, select Start from a Quicken 2007 file.
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
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