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Partial liquidation of investment

Unknown
Unknown Member
edited October 2018 in Investing (Windows)
Have an investment.  n shares.  Received a payment for a partial liquidation of the investment. 
Value of shares is now $0.30/share.  Received a final payment for final liquidation of the investment.
Value of share is now $0.00
How do I record this in Quicken to reflect receipt of payments and reduction price of shares???

Comments

  • Rocket J Squirrel
    Rocket J Squirrel SuperUser, Windows Beta ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2018
    You have 2 Sell transactions.
    Quicken user since version 2 for DOS, now using QWin Premier Subscription on Win10 Pro.
  • NotACPA
    NotACPA SuperUser, Windows Beta Beta
    edited October 2018
    Actually, that 1st transaction MIGHT be a Return of Capital ... IF the # of shares stayed the same and only the value of each share changed.

    The 2nd is definitely a sale.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription,  Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited April 2017

    You have 2 Sell transactions.

    The number of shares does not change with either of the distributions.
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited April 2017

    Actually, that 1st transaction MIGHT be a Return of Capital ... IF the # of shares stayed the same and only the value of each share changed.

    The 2nd is definitely a sale.

    But after the second liquidation distribution, I am left with the same number of shares with $0.00 values, so can't sell them.  
  • mshiggins
    mshiggins SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2017
    You'll need to tell us what actually took place. What was the stock and why was it liquidated.
    Quicken user since Q1999. Currently using QW2017.
    Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited May 2018
    It is a REIT-real estate investment trust.  I had a number of shares in the REIT.  The Board adopted a plan of liquidation and dissolution of the plan.  Liquidation was done in two parts.  A larger pay-out, then the remaining payout.  However, I still own the original number of shares, they just have zero value at present.  It is possible there could be another payout if the REIT ends up with extra monies not used to pay the final expenses.
  • mshiggins
    mshiggins SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2017

    It is a REIT-real estate investment trust.  I had a number of shares in the REIT.  The Board adopted a plan of liquidation and dissolution of the plan.  Liquidation was done in two parts.  A larger pay-out, then the remaining payout.  However, I still own the original number of shares, they just have zero value at present.  It is possible there could be another payout if the REIT ends up with extra monies not used to pay the final expenses.

    It sounds like they returned your capital. I would use the Return of Capital transaction type to record rhe two distributions.
    Quicken user since Q1999. Currently using QW2017.
    Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list
  • q_lurker
    q_lurker SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2017

    It is a REIT-real estate investment trust.  I had a number of shares in the REIT.  The Board adopted a plan of liquidation and dissolution of the plan.  Liquidation was done in two parts.  A larger pay-out, then the remaining payout.  However, I still own the original number of shares, they just have zero value at present.  It is possible there could be another payout if the REIT ends up with extra monies not used to pay the final expenses.

    Return of capital is only valid up to the cost basis of your holding.  I do not know what the current Quicken editions do if your total RtrnCap exceeds your basis.  Return of capital is not taxable income.  

    @Namcy Jackson:  you need to determine what this money actually is - tax-wise, to get proper transactions into Quicken.  Some may be RtrnCap.  Some may be DivInc.  Some may be a category that Quicken does not address accurately that you will need to shoehorn into a different category.

    In the meantime, or if such accuracy is not important to you, then you can show the payouts as DivInc or MiscInc to a self-created category.  Simultaneously, you would decrease the value of the shares as well through the portfolio view or similar steps.   
This discussion has been closed.