Is there a way to re-download transactions Quicken for Mac

This is my issue:
I download my transactions from my bank 
I've in the past accidentally deleted a (lot) transaction, and then notice
it's not re-downloaded if I either One Step Update or export transactions from my Bank to a QFX.
Is there a way around this?
Thanks!

Best Answers

  • Studpup
    Studpup Windows Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    Can you restore from the latest backup (either Quicken's backup or use time machine)? Just save your current version in case you have manually keyed in transactions that won't exist in your restored version.
    I'm not a quicken employee, just trying to be a helpful pup!
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    @alino  Quicken Mac intentionally keeps a hidden record of the transaction ID of transactions you have downloaded in order to prevent duplicates on subsequent downloads. If you manually deleted the transactions, Quicken assumed you did so intentionally, and prevents them from downloading again. So, basically, there is no way to re-download transactions you have deleted.

    There is a way to hack around this, but it may be more trouble and clean-up than it's worth. (You may have a lot of duplicate transactions to weed out, and you may need to re-categorize transactions you're downloading again.) The idea is to create a new Quicken file, set up your bank account in that file, download your transactions into that file, export this Quicken file to QXF format and import it into your existing Quicken file, and then carefully merge the contents of the two bank accounts to avoid duplicate transactions.

    Let's start with this important tip: make a copy of your data file before you start any of this, in case you find you have a bigger mess than before you started, and you want to go back.

    Next, how far back are these transaction you want to recover? Most banks allow online downloads from the past 90 days only. (This isn't controlled by Quicken; it's up to the bank.) If you're looking for transactions in the past 12 months, some banks allow you dow download a file in .QFX format which you can then import into Quicken. Just be aware that the more transactions you have, the more work it will be to weed out duplicate when you merge the data.

    Here's how you'd approach this:

    1) Create a new, blank Quicken data file as a temporary file. Create your one bank account, and either download transactions from the bank or import the .QFX file you downloaded from the bank. 

    2) Export this temporary Quicken data file to .QXF format: File > Export > Quicken Transfer File.

    3) Open your main Quicken data file. Import the .QFX file that came from the temporary file with the bank account download: File > Import > Quicken Windows File (QDF, QXF).

    4) Now you should have two accounts for you bank account: your original and the one you just imported. Find the transactions in your imported account which are missing from your existing account; select them in the imported account, and drag them to the existing account in the left sidebar, and the transactions will move. You can move them all, and then go through and eliminate duplicates, or you can select which ones to move (Command click allows you to select multiple transactions at a time, and then you can drag them to the existing account in the left sidebar).

    5) You'll have to be careful to make sure you're pulling in the transactions you want, not missing any, and not creating duplicates. You may need to adjust your opening balance to get your current balance to the correct value.

    6) When you have all the transactions you want in your account, you can delete what's left of the imported account (Control-click the imported account in the left sidebar, then select Delete form the pop-up menu). And you can delete the temporary Quicken file you created for the import.

    If that sounds too treacherous to you, or like too much work, you might find it easier to manually enter the missing transactions -- it just depends how many you have.
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993

Answers

  • Studpup
    Studpup Windows Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    Can you restore from the latest backup (either Quicken's backup or use time machine)? Just save your current version in case you have manually keyed in transactions that won't exist in your restored version.
    I'm not a quicken employee, just trying to be a helpful pup!
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    @alino  Quicken Mac intentionally keeps a hidden record of the transaction ID of transactions you have downloaded in order to prevent duplicates on subsequent downloads. If you manually deleted the transactions, Quicken assumed you did so intentionally, and prevents them from downloading again. So, basically, there is no way to re-download transactions you have deleted.

    There is a way to hack around this, but it may be more trouble and clean-up than it's worth. (You may have a lot of duplicate transactions to weed out, and you may need to re-categorize transactions you're downloading again.) The idea is to create a new Quicken file, set up your bank account in that file, download your transactions into that file, export this Quicken file to QXF format and import it into your existing Quicken file, and then carefully merge the contents of the two bank accounts to avoid duplicate transactions.

    Let's start with this important tip: make a copy of your data file before you start any of this, in case you find you have a bigger mess than before you started, and you want to go back.

    Next, how far back are these transaction you want to recover? Most banks allow online downloads from the past 90 days only. (This isn't controlled by Quicken; it's up to the bank.) If you're looking for transactions in the past 12 months, some banks allow you dow download a file in .QFX format which you can then import into Quicken. Just be aware that the more transactions you have, the more work it will be to weed out duplicate when you merge the data.

    Here's how you'd approach this:

    1) Create a new, blank Quicken data file as a temporary file. Create your one bank account, and either download transactions from the bank or import the .QFX file you downloaded from the bank. 

    2) Export this temporary Quicken data file to .QXF format: File > Export > Quicken Transfer File.

    3) Open your main Quicken data file. Import the .QFX file that came from the temporary file with the bank account download: File > Import > Quicken Windows File (QDF, QXF).

    4) Now you should have two accounts for you bank account: your original and the one you just imported. Find the transactions in your imported account which are missing from your existing account; select them in the imported account, and drag them to the existing account in the left sidebar, and the transactions will move. You can move them all, and then go through and eliminate duplicates, or you can select which ones to move (Command click allows you to select multiple transactions at a time, and then you can drag them to the existing account in the left sidebar).

    5) You'll have to be careful to make sure you're pulling in the transactions you want, not missing any, and not creating duplicates. You may need to adjust your opening balance to get your current balance to the correct value.

    6) When you have all the transactions you want in your account, you can delete what's left of the imported account (Control-click the imported account in the left sidebar, then select Delete form the pop-up menu). And you can delete the temporary Quicken file you created for the import.

    If that sounds too treacherous to you, or like too much work, you might find it easier to manually enter the missing transactions -- it just depends how many you have.
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • alino
    alino Mac Beta Beta
    edited February 27
    I was afraid this was the only solution...
    thanks
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