Moved from Win to Mac, now IRA shows negative cash value for all shares sold

This did not happen in windows. I have gone through every transaction in both windows and Mac and matched every transaction, yet my market value is correct in windows but negative cash value and market value in Mac. I have sold $180000 worth of shares and my market value shows a negative $180000 cash less residual stock value in account. This is very frustrating. I cannot figure out how to fix. It shows up as a huge negative market value in my net worth.
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Best Answers

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    Unfortunately, I think this is one of the issues with the import of Quicken Windows data into Quicken Mac. Where your transactions in Windows of the BoughtX/SoldX type? These apparently do not translate correctly in the import into Quicken Mac.

    Could you post a screen shot of what you're seeing for one or more of your sale transactions in windows and then in Quicken Mac? I'd actually expect you to see an extra $180,000 in cash in the account you sold shares, and perhaps a negative $180,000 in whatever account was to receive the proceeds of those sales. I'm guessing from your description that a transfer between accounts is missing, but seeing an example or two should help clarify this and point towards a way to resolve it.
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    You can simply drag a screen shot into the message area; it will appear where your cursor is positioned. (There is a second way to add messages via the editing toolbar, but the Quicken folks have it disabled for new users on the forum because twins being exploited by scammer sin the past; after some additional activity here, you will see the picture icon appear in the toolbar.)

    In Quicken Windows, it sounds like you used SellX transactions: A combination of selling  security and transferring the proceed to a different account. Quicken Mac does not use these 'X' transactions; they must be represented by two transactions: one selling a security and producing cash (even if it's just on paper for an instant) and a second transferring that cash to the desired destination.

    But I'm not clear on how the importer from Quicken Windows creates these transactions behind the scenes. In your checking account, you have the proceeds of the sales showing as deposits correctly? So your checking account is correct? And are these showing as transfers from the T-Rowe Price account? (In the Category field, do you see "Transfer" or "Transfer:[T-Rowe Price]" (or whatever the name of your account in Quicken? That might shed light on what's happening.

    Now, in the T-Rowe Price account, when you look at one of the transactions where you sold shares, what is the Type shown for the transaction? Is it simply "Sell" or something else? Does that transaction show a value in the Amount column, and does it change the running Balance column?

    What we'd expect in Quicken Mac is that you have a Sell transaction which creates a positive Cash balance in the account, and then you'd have a Payment/Deposit transaction to transfer the cash out of this account and into the checking account. Here's a dummy transaction selling 10 shares of Apple stock and then transferring it to a checking account:



    So we need to understand what it's done differently when it imported your data in order to figure out the best approach to getting your account balances correct.


    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993

Answers

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    Unfortunately, I think this is one of the issues with the import of Quicken Windows data into Quicken Mac. Where your transactions in Windows of the BoughtX/SoldX type? These apparently do not translate correctly in the import into Quicken Mac.

    Could you post a screen shot of what you're seeing for one or more of your sale transactions in windows and then in Quicken Mac? I'd actually expect you to see an extra $180,000 in cash in the account you sold shares, and perhaps a negative $180,000 in whatever account was to receive the proceeds of those sales. I'm guessing from your description that a transfer between accounts is missing, but seeing an example or two should help clarify this and point towards a way to resolve it.
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • wetherhaven
    wetherhaven Member
    How do I add a screen shot to this message. I would be happy to do so. If I cannot do so, I would be happy to email you screen shots of both platforms. This is a mutual fund account which I have withdrawn $180000 from over the last 8 years. The transactions are in T-Rowe Price and are cash transactions in that I cash in x$ per transaction and have the cash transferred to my checking account directly. In windows Quicken, the transactions show as a sale of stock with no cash impact on the account. There is no cash in the account, only stock. I cannot edit the transfers without editing the transaction in my checking account in Mac. Here is what I am wondering. Should I create new transactions from checking with no stock impact then create new transactions in Quicken Mac selling stock? That would then I think generate cash into the account which I would then transfer out giving me a zero balance, I think. A bit of work but if the software will not work the same way I may have to give it a try.
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    You can simply drag a screen shot into the message area; it will appear where your cursor is positioned. (There is a second way to add messages via the editing toolbar, but the Quicken folks have it disabled for new users on the forum because twins being exploited by scammer sin the past; after some additional activity here, you will see the picture icon appear in the toolbar.)

    In Quicken Windows, it sounds like you used SellX transactions: A combination of selling  security and transferring the proceed to a different account. Quicken Mac does not use these 'X' transactions; they must be represented by two transactions: one selling a security and producing cash (even if it's just on paper for an instant) and a second transferring that cash to the desired destination.

    But I'm not clear on how the importer from Quicken Windows creates these transactions behind the scenes. In your checking account, you have the proceeds of the sales showing as deposits correctly? So your checking account is correct? And are these showing as transfers from the T-Rowe Price account? (In the Category field, do you see "Transfer" or "Transfer:[T-Rowe Price]" (or whatever the name of your account in Quicken? That might shed light on what's happening.

    Now, in the T-Rowe Price account, when you look at one of the transactions where you sold shares, what is the Type shown for the transaction? Is it simply "Sell" or something else? Does that transaction show a value in the Amount column, and does it change the running Balance column?

    What we'd expect in Quicken Mac is that you have a Sell transaction which creates a positive Cash balance in the account, and then you'd have a Payment/Deposit transaction to transfer the cash out of this account and into the checking account. Here's a dummy transaction selling 10 shares of Apple stock and then transferring it to a checking account:



    So we need to understand what it's done differently when it imported your data in order to figure out the best approach to getting your account balances correct.


    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • wetherhaven
    wetherhaven Member
    Jacobs, you are spot on. That seems to be the issue. So I need to go into both checking and quicken and create two transactions for each stock sale. That is now clear to me after your explanation. Very helpful. Thank you so much for the help.
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    You should only need to make one additional transaction if the security sale transaction is already present, in one account or the other. The key is making the category a transfer (or use the Transfer column if you prefer). If you make the transaction in the investment account with an outflow of money, Quicken creates the linked transfer of money into your checking account. Or you could enter the transaction in your checking account as a deposit, again using Category or Transfer from the investment account, and Quicken will create the linked transaction to withdraw funds from your investment account.  
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
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