Converting older versions of quicken to newer version (Q Mac)

ronroberts
ronroberts Member ✭✭
I know this has been covered many times in many articles, but I have not found a solution that addresses the specifics of my situation.

I am currently running Q 2007 version 16.0 on Mac Snow leopard. Since this is on an old computer (2008 Macbook) which could just stop working some day, I would like to upgrade to a more current quicken version on my newer computer.

My current 2007 was transferred from my PC to a Mac in 2008. When I click on "about Quicken" it reads version 16.0, 7/20/06, modified 11/20/08. It doesn't say if it is for PC or Mac, but I assume the Apple store might have needed to convert to Quicken for Mac in order to transfer the app and all the data from my PC back in 2008.

What I would like to do is get as new a version as possible for my new computer, put my old version on a thumb drive, and have the the data transferred to the new version. I know the new version will not be the same as Q 2007 and that is OK, as long as my current history is included in the new version.

Or Option #2: Do I need to archive all my 2007 data on a storage device and start fresh
with a new version, and not be able to include my current transaction history?

If so, would I be able to even read that data on current Mac operating systems, or can it
only be read on Snow Leopard or earlier?

Is this possible, or will my current 16.0 data never be able to move to a newer quicken running on current Mac operating systems.

Any help would be appreciated, but I know very little how to do things on computers, and often I find suggestions to be completely over my head, so please dumb things down for me as much as possible.

Thanks!

Best Answer

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    I'm not sure I understand the transfer from Windows to Mac back in 2008, but it shouldn't be relevant. You're running Quicken 2007 for Mac, and that's all we need to know. The good news is that the modern Quicken Mac on a newer Mac will be able to import your Quicken 2007 data file without missing a beat. Well, there will be somewhat of a learning curve to get used to the interface and operations of the new Quicken Mac, but all your data will be preserved in the transition.

    All you need is a Mac running the current or latest two versions of macOS. You'll purchase a subscription to Quicken and download Quicken Mac. You'll copy your Quicken 2007 data file to the new Mac (via flash drive, email or file sharing). You'll launch Quicken Mac on the new computer and on the start screen, you'll specify that you want to start from a Quicken 2007 data file. Select the file, and Quicken will do its thing to export and import your data, and a few minutes later, you'll be off and running.

    One additional tip: before you move your data file to the new Mac, on the old Mac, re-build the indexes of your data file. (To do this, open the Accounts window and press Command-Option-B). The old database in Quicken 2007 sometimes has some internal corruption which can cause unexpected results, and rebuilding the indexes can prevent those problems when you transfer your data to modern Quicken Mac. 

    Once you move to the new Mac, if you can still run your old Mac at the same time, it will be easier for you to go through your accounts on both computers to make sure all your accounts came across and see if there are any problems with account balances. Hopefully most things will be in order with little or no work. You might even want to work in parallel for a week or two, entering data in both the old and new Quicken as you get used to the new program. You will not be able to run the old Quicken 2007 on the new computer, so once you decide you're done with Quicken 2007 and get rid of your old computer, there will be no way to access your old Quicken 2007 data file -- but you shouldn't have any need to because all your data will be in the modern Quicken Mac. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993

Answers

  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Accepted Answer
    I'm not sure I understand the transfer from Windows to Mac back in 2008, but it shouldn't be relevant. You're running Quicken 2007 for Mac, and that's all we need to know. The good news is that the modern Quicken Mac on a newer Mac will be able to import your Quicken 2007 data file without missing a beat. Well, there will be somewhat of a learning curve to get used to the interface and operations of the new Quicken Mac, but all your data will be preserved in the transition.

    All you need is a Mac running the current or latest two versions of macOS. You'll purchase a subscription to Quicken and download Quicken Mac. You'll copy your Quicken 2007 data file to the new Mac (via flash drive, email or file sharing). You'll launch Quicken Mac on the new computer and on the start screen, you'll specify that you want to start from a Quicken 2007 data file. Select the file, and Quicken will do its thing to export and import your data, and a few minutes later, you'll be off and running.

    One additional tip: before you move your data file to the new Mac, on the old Mac, re-build the indexes of your data file. (To do this, open the Accounts window and press Command-Option-B). The old database in Quicken 2007 sometimes has some internal corruption which can cause unexpected results, and rebuilding the indexes can prevent those problems when you transfer your data to modern Quicken Mac. 

    Once you move to the new Mac, if you can still run your old Mac at the same time, it will be easier for you to go through your accounts on both computers to make sure all your accounts came across and see if there are any problems with account balances. Hopefully most things will be in order with little or no work. You might even want to work in parallel for a week or two, entering data in both the old and new Quicken as you get used to the new program. You will not be able to run the old Quicken 2007 on the new computer, so once you decide you're done with Quicken 2007 and get rid of your old computer, there will be no way to access your old Quicken 2007 data file -- but you shouldn't have any need to because all your data will be in the modern Quicken Mac. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • John_in_NC
    John_in_NC SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Howdy, ronroberts:

    Yes, you are using the Mac version of Quicken. And, you can pretty much scratch off upgrading to a newer version on your older machine. 

    You didn't mention the specs of your newer machine, so we can't even tell you if the modern version of Quicken for Mac will even run. Provide them if you know the details.

    But, do know the latest version of Quicken for Mac will import and convert your 2007 file so that you can retain your transactional history. You don't have to start fresh.

    Yes, you will move the file to external storage such as a flash drive. I won't bore or complicate things with the details, but you need to find your data file and compress it before moving it to the device. It is imperative you compress, or it will render the file useless. The Apple store can likely help you, but reiterate that the file must be compressed.

    I tried to keep this basic for now as not to overwhelm. But, yes, you can get your data onto a newer machine assuming it is capable/you have purchased newer Quicken.
  • ronroberts
    ronroberts Member ✭✭
    Thanks John and Jacobs!
    @John: My newer computer is...well not very new either LOL. 2014 Macbook pro running Yosemite. Before transferring Q2007 I would update my Operating system to either the current one.

    One of my concerns was that the new version of Quicken would not have the same tabs, folders etc for me to access imported data from the Q2007 version.

    Thanks for the heads up from both of you regarding compression and rebuilding the indexes.
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    Your 2014 MacBook Pro is able to run macOS Big Sur, or the older Catalina or Mojave, any of which can run the current Quicken Mac. (I don't believe that Mac will be able to run the about-to-be-released macOS Monterery, though.) You should have a clear path forward once you upgrade your operating system and purchase a subscription for the current Quicken Mac. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • ronroberts
    ronroberts Member ✭✭
    I think by the time I would upgrade to Monterey it will be time to replace my current 2014 Mac.

    One detail I want to be sure is being considered here is the difference between my 2007 quicken 16.0 and the later versions of 2007. I did gather from prior research that 2020 quicken can accept 16.1 but not 16.0, but I might be confused on that. So, just want to confirm that the above posts on this thread do apply to 16.0. Thanks
  • ronroberts
    ronroberts Member ✭✭
    @Jacobs, Although I am not ready to transfer files yet, I did open my accounts window and rebuilt the indexes (Control-Option-B) and lost about 6 weeks of data. Last entries are now dated 9/4/21. Is there a way to undo this or restore the lost data? Under File there is an option for restore and I can choose from disc or .mac, but I don't want to try either no knowing what I'm doing and what further problem I might cause.
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    The database in Quicken 2007 unfortunately has some instabilities and is prone to bouts of data corruption. Usually it reveals itself with transactions appear out of order, which is fixed after the reindexing. I once lost some data but didn't know it until nearly a year later when I couldn't restore from a backup. 

    First, I'd re-build the indexes again. I've seen reindexing fail, and then succeed when run again. 

    Next, think about one or two of the recent transactions which are missing and see if you can search for them by the amount or memo or payee. In one of the cases of corruption I experienced, a chunk of transactions seemed to disappear, but actually turned up intact with dates more than a year earlier. Weird. 

    Next: do you have a recent automatic or manual backup? I'd keep your live file -- rename it and stick it aside -- and then try restoring a few different backups, starting with a very recent one and working backwards, to see if any of them do not have the same problem when you rebuild the indexes. 

    For what it's worth, the data you appear to have lost probably would not have made it when you transitioned to modern Quicken Mac; better to know and figure out what to do about it now than later. 


    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993
  • ronroberts
    ronroberts Member ✭✭
    Thanks Jacobs. After I made that last post about loosing data, I went back into my Q files and looked at a few more of them and they all had the same last date of about 6 weeks ago. I noticed a few files that were labeled (Bkup). I opened one of them and all may data was there and up to date.

    My quicken backs up automatically. I don't know what a live file is.

    The file that I selected and rebuilt the index was not labeled (Bkup). It was was labeled "Data file". I have different files and folders some say data file, some say data file and have a number before them, and some say "data file (Bkup)" and some have (Bkup) repeating 2-3 times. There is also a folder that is labeled "Quicken Backup Folder"

    So when it comes time to transfer data, which file or folder should I select to rebuild the index and transfer?

    Included with the current subscription is phone support to guide me through the process (according to a chat session today with Quicken). Luddite that I am, do you think it would be better to have help from someone who can share my screen, or does Quicken Support have that capability?

    Thanks