Chase Issue

Bob F.
Bob F. Member
I'm a long time Chase and Quicken customer. I dutifully followed the instructions to change to the new connection method, and now my Chase Checking register in Quicken no longer matches the real world (my paper register and my account on the Chase website). After 20 years of matching perfectly, I am very unhappy. Can I open a Quicken backup from the day before the change to see where it's different and fix it, without mucking up the most recent Quicken data file? The "File" drop down suggests I can open a different data file instead of the primary one, but where do I go for that file - to my WD Hard Drive where I back up Quicken regularly? To the backup folder on C drive? Any other suggestions? The Chase checking account register in Quicken now thinks I have $250.00 more than Chase thinks.

Answers

  • Greg_the_Geek
    Greg_the_Geek SuperUser, Windows Beta ✭✭✭✭✭
    I would suggest checking the Opening Balance in your Chase Checking account first. When I converted my Chase Visa, the opening balance was changed to the last downloaded transaction.

    You can open a Quicken backup file from Quicken by changing the file extension from .QDF-Backup to .QDF and then browsing to the file location in Quicken.
    Quicken Subscription HBRP - Windows 10
  • Bob F.
    Bob F. Member
    I started using Quicken in 2003, and I have no bank statements going back that far, nor will Chase retrieve statements that old. So I can't validate the Quicken Chase checking register opening balance number. I had been using Chase for years before Quicken and getting Quicken and Chase to mesh took a lot of work back then!
  • Greg_the_Geek
    Greg_the_Geek SuperUser, Windows Beta ✭✭✭✭✭
    If you open a Quicken backup from before the conversion, you should be able to find the Opening Balance.
    Quicken Subscription HBRP - Windows 10
  • Bob F.
    Bob F. Member
    Thanks! Opening a pre-conversion file for comparison purposes sounds promising, but I think I need a more detailed step-by-step walk-through for the process of opening an alternate data file, without compromising my ability to return to the later default data file. Sorry, but dinking around with these data files scares me! Is changing the file extension that simple, and that inconsequential?
  • Tom Young
    Tom Young SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    One way of opening a backup without touching your current "live" data file or getting confused is to use File Explorer to go into your list of backups, determine what backup you want to look at, hover the mouse cursor over the name of the file, right click, and RENAME the file.  You could name it something like "Looking at Chase Opening Balance" to make it very, very distinct from your current data file.

  • Bob F.
    Bob F. Member
    As suggested above, I took the backup file Quicken made the day before the conversion and renamed it, making the extension .qdf. Windows, however, still thinks the renamed file, with the .qdf extension, is a Quicken backup data file (looking at "properties" for that renamed file). Will Quicken be able to open such a file?
  • Tom Young
    Tom Young SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    You didn't change the file properties at all.  You simply changed the name. 
    It really is a Quicken data backup file, a file that has the data inside your "live" Quicken data file on the date you saved it.

  • Bob F.
    Bob F. Member
    There is, of course, another problem with the new Chase process: When I synced our credit card, it downloaded a dozen or more transactions characterized as "new" even though most of those transactions were already in the ledger and previously cleared. I had to look at each one, check to see if it it's already in the ledger, and, if so, delete the downloaded transaction. WTF?? In the "old" days (two days ago), an already cleared transaction wouldn't even be listed in the download, and transactions in the ledger but not yet cleared would be matched up for me to accept.