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Price History has additional entries

Unknown
Unknown Member
edited November 2018 in Investing (Windows)
Using Quicken 2017 R6, I was reviewing some price history for some mutual funds (which do NOT have any associated stock symbols), and there are additional price history items in several. Then when you look at the graph, you'll see a price history bounce up and down (by a LOT - it's not just minor price fluctuations). Oh SURE, I can clean them up by deleting the many entries, but that's labor intensive. Any ideas?

Comments

  • mshiggins
    mshiggins SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2017
    Price history entries come from transactions or can be downloaded from your financial institution. Why do you think the entries are a problem?
    Quicken user since Q1999. Currently using QW2017.
    Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited October 2018
    Because the price vacillates between $11 $60 . So the $60 security price is not correct and I don't know where that data came from as there is no ticker symbol even on that item
  • mshiggins
    mshiggins SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2017

    Because the price vacillates between $11 $60 . So the $60 security price is not correct and I don't know where that data came from as there is no ticker symbol even on that item

    Price history data comes first from transactions. Do you have a transaction on the date of the $60 price?
    Quicken user since Q1999. Currently using QW2017.
    Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list
  • q_lurker
    q_lurker SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2017

    Because the price vacillates between $11 $60 . So the $60 security price is not correct and I don't know where that data came from as there is no ticker symbol even on that item

    If you have the account set up to download transactions from your mutual fund company, then as they download transactions, they also (typically) download prices for the holdings for that date.


    So as best I recall, prices can come from:

    Downloads from Quicken's servers (requires tickers which you have excluded)

    Downloads from the financial institution

    Your manual entry as a direct price on a specific date

    Through transaction entry (like buys, sells, reinvestments, etc.)

    Your import of data as a csv file

    Your import of data as a QIF file

    Some other obscure way I've forgotten.


    All offered FWIW.
  • mshiggins
    mshiggins SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2017

    Because the price vacillates between $11 $60 . So the $60 security price is not correct and I don't know where that data came from as there is no ticker symbol even on that item

    And if the price data came from the FI during transaction downloading, I would be very hesitant to delete that data as it may be impossible to recreate without a lot of pain.
    Quicken user since Q1999. Currently using QW2017.
    Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited August 2017

    Because the price vacillates between $11 $60 . So the $60 security price is not correct and I don't know where that data came from as there is no ticker symbol even on that item

    In one case, on March 28th, I have 3 transactions that are all priced $44, but the price history shows $28 on that day. WEIRD.
  • NotACPA
    NotACPA SuperUser, Windows Beta Beta
    edited August 2017

    Because the price vacillates between $11 $60 . So the $60 security price is not correct and I don't know where that data came from as there is no ticker symbol even on that item

    Roger, is that $28/$44 day recent?  If so, it might be worth the effort to take a look at your OFX log to see what the fund company is sending.

    HELP, Log Files, OFX Log.  Save it to your desktop, and then open it with NotePad or WordPad (NOT MS Word). 

    Then do a search for 44.00 and see what shows up.  If nothing, search for 28.00.  Note the absence of dollar signs in both searchs.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription,  Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited August 2017

    Because the price vacillates between $11 $60 . So the $60 security price is not correct and I don't know where that data came from as there is no ticker symbol even on that item

    More info on this - this appears to be limited to dates before June 2016.  All more recent data seems good.
  • Jim_Harman
    Jim_Harman SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2018
    If the funds don't have tickers in Quicken and are not matched to an online security, then I think it is most likely that the bogus price history comes from erroneous transactions you entered manually. For example you might have transposed two digits in the dividend amount when entering a dividend reinvestment. 

    Look for transactions on dates with wrong values in the price history and see if anything is amiss. Hopefully correcting any bad transactions will also correct the price history, but if not at least you will know what the value should be and you can correct it manually.

    When entering dividend reinvestments manually, I always check that the computed price per share is reasonable before clicking OK. I have caught many typos this way.
    QWin Premier subscription
  • Jim_Harman
    Jim_Harman SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2018
    You are right that if you have securities like unit investment trusts that are not publicly traded in different accounts they may have very different values. For example I once had something called "Capital Guardian International" with a value of about 55 in one account and 8 in another. 

    The only work-around here is to give then different names in Quicken so it will treat them separately.

    As you have observed, when you are entering transactions you may encounter round-off errors that lead to slight differences between the share prices in Quicken's price history and your statements. It is certainly important to get the date right.

    It is almost always best to make sure you get the investment amount and number of shares purchased correct, and accept Quicken's calculation of the share price. If you use the method you describe above where you try to force a particular share price, you will either end up with the wrong number of shares or the wrong amount invested.
    QWin Premier subscription
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