How do record notational adjustment to an ETF that increases the book value of the investment

Unknown
Unknown Member
edited October 2018 in Investing (Mac)

Comments

  • mshiggins
    mshiggins SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2018
    Is this a US account or Canadian account?
    Quicken user since Q1999. Currently using QW2017.
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  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited April 2018
    Canadian account
  • NotACPA
    NotACPA SuperUser, Windows Beta Beta
    edited October 2018
    Please explain what you mean by a "notational adjustment" ... and why this isn't just a new price for the security.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription, Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited April 2018
    It is like a capital gain that only changes the book value of your investment and not the cash account or the number of shares you hold
  • RickO
    RickO SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    edited April 2018
    Craig said:

    It is like a capital gain that only changes the book value of your investment and not the cash account or the number of shares you hold

    Wouldn't it just be reflected as an increase in the price per share?
    Quicken Mac Subscription; Quicken Mac user since the early 90s
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited April 2018
    Craig said:

    It is like a capital gain that only changes the book value of your investment and not the cash account or the number of shares you hold

    No that would be the market value, the adjustment increases the book value of the investment (effectively reduces capital gains tax)
  • Tom Young
    Tom Young SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2018
    Craig said:

    It is like a capital gain that only changes the book value of your investment and not the cash account or the number of shares you hold

    "book value of your investment"

    Is that the "cost basis" you're speaking about?

    I'm thinking a long the lines of a capital gain not distributed to you in cash but which you were obligated to report as taxable income?
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited April 2018
    Craig said:

    It is like a capital gain that only changes the book value of your investment and not the cash account or the number of shares you hold

    Yes sorry cost basis, yes this is it exactly
  • Unknown
    Unknown Member
    edited June 2018
    Yes, wish we could do this as it is required by CRA. Tried different ways but does not work. We need a transaction item 'Adjustment to Book Cost'. It would only affect the cost of the security without changing the number of shares nor the market price. 
    This is Canadian and It would be nice If Quicken took care of the Canadian side of things. This has been CRA law for the past 15 years at least and I have asked for this before.
  • Tom Young
    Tom Young SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited June 2018
    Just to state what I think is happening... Some company or mutual fund or something has a capital gain, (I'm guessing at that - it doesn't really matter), a capital gain that shareholders have to recognize in their income tax return and which increases their basis in the company/mutual fund/something.
    Using the US version I can achieve that pretty closely as follows:
    Create a "Long Term Capital Gain" Category, (the _RlzdGain Category isn't available for your use):
    image
    Assign that Category to the correct tax form:
    image
    Report the gain in the Account using a MiscInc action:
    image
    And then remove the cash with a negative return of capital transaction:
    image
    That succession of  transactions does get the income reported, increases the basis of the stock without affecting shares or market value and leaves cash unchanged.
    Not knowing the Canadian version at all I don't know if that's possible to duplicate.
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