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What's the best way to use an account in an existing file with a newly created file?

Hi, I'm looking for help in setting up a simple file for a rental property, to keep it separate from my main personal file. I use a checking account dedicated to the rental that is currently being downloaded and hidden by my main quicken file. Both the checking account and a bank credit card currently download to the main quicken file. Ideally, I would keep the credit card with the existing file, but the checking account with the new file. Is that even possible?

Should I close the checking account in the main file, or does that close it with all quicken files?
If I keep the accounts hidden in the files I don't need them, will that continue to download all the transactions in both accounts?

I'm sure if I understood quicken a little better, I could make it work. I haven't found this specific topic in a search. Thanks for any help!

Best Answer

Answers

  • blc
    blc Member
    Very helpful. I was concerned that if I closed the account in one file it might no longer work in any file. Thanks for confirming that that is not the case.
  • Greg_the_Geek
    Greg_the_Geek SuperUser, Windows Beta ✭✭✭✭✭
    Please be aware that if you split your accounts into 2 Quicken data files, it's not easy to merge them back together again.
    Quicken Subscription HBRP - Windows 10
  • NotACPA
    NotACPA SuperUser, Windows Beta Beta
    Please be aware that if you split your accounts into 2 Quicken data files, it's not easy to merge them back together again.
    ln fact, it's just this side of maddeningly impossible.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription,  Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • blc
    blc Member
    Good to know. It sounds like you get one shot to do it right. I'll probably screw it up :smiley:
  • GeoffG
    GeoffG SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    That's where the importance of multiple redundant backups is absolutely essential. You can perform any "what if" scenario and if you do not like the outcome, or more importantly find adverse side affects down-the-line, you simply restore back to a good state.
    user since '92 | Quicken Windows Premier - Subscription | Windows 10 Pro version 20H2
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