Home Quicken for Windows File Conversion and Backup (Windows)

What do all these files represent...

I'd appreciate it to know what all these files represent, how they originated, can I delete them safely, and is there a "safer" way to delete them. An added note is there is 1 file in the backup folder.

Comments

  • splashersplasher SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    QDATA.QDF is your data file.  DO NOT DELETE

    QDATAOFXLOG.DAT is the log file of what is downloaded from your financial institutions.  You can delete it, but Quicken will recreate it the next time you download transactions.

    qdata_SyncLog.dat is another log file, similar comments as above, just logging the sync process.

    QDATA-2020-03-14.QDF-backup is a MANUAL backup that you made on 3/14/2020.  The location was determined by a decision you made while making the backup.

    _gdata_ is a folder that you must have created because I have never seen one before.

    BACKUP is the folder where Quicken puts the automatic backups that it makes depending on your Preference Backup settings.  If you delete it, it will be recreated when the next auto-backup is made and you can not change the location, it is always a child of where the data file is located.

    BOTTOMLINE: I wouldn't delete any of them, leave them be.
    -splasher  using Q since 1996 -  Subscription  -  Win10
    -also older versions as needed for testing
    -Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list

  • ps56kps56k SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    All of your data is stored in the - Quicken Data File - or QDF -
    There will be a few other files, like you see,
    that record the events and activity of various downloads, connections, etc.

    The "Backup" file should really be in the [Backup] folder, along with other auto-backups.
    Use the .... Edit --> Preferences --> to define your Backup numbers & options.
    You should create LOTS of backups - use the auto-backup along with the manual ones create with .... File --> Backup and Restore -->



    Quicken 2020 Deluxe - Subscription - Windows 10
  • splashersplasher SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    @ps56k
     The backup file is a manual backup (no time stamp, just a date), so it should not be in the BACKUP folder with the auto-backups (date and time stamp).

    It really should be on a different storage device than the actual data file in case the drive dies, everything is not lost.  Thumbdrive and cloud storage are good choices.

    -splasher  using Q since 1996 -  Subscription  -  Win10
    -also older versions as needed for testing
    -Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list

  • TJ102TJ102 Member ✭✭✭✭
    gsdata is a file I used with GoodSync to sync to another drive That was probably a both ways sync...a problem? Also I tried to backup to a thumb drive and it told me it would overwrite the file already on it with (no option)...first time I ever saw that and don't know why! Thanks for clarifying all this for me! I usually let the auto backup do the work, unless I made some kind of change I need to be sure is backed up. ;)
  • splashersplasher SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    TJ102 said:
    … Also I tried to backup to a thumb drive and it told me it would overwrite the file already on it with (no option)...first time I ever saw that and don't know why! …
    You must have had the option to add the date to the file name unchecked when making the manual backup.
    As far as backups are concerned, they need to made to some remote/removable device since something can cause anything permanently installed or connected to your computer to be wiped out (lightning, fire, water, theft, etc).
    -splasher  using Q since 1996 -  Subscription  -  Win10
    -also older versions as needed for testing
    -Questions? Check out the  Quicken Windows FAQ list

  • SherlockSherlock SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    TJ102 said:
    gsdata is a file I used with GoodSync to sync to another drive That was probably a both ways sync...a problem? Also I tried to backup to a thumb drive and it told me it would overwrite the file already on it with (no option)...first time I ever saw that and don't know why! Thanks for clarifying all this for me! I usually let the auto backup do the work, unless I made some kind of change I need to be sure is backed up. ;)
    Possibly.  Quicken doesn't play well with others.  I suggest not allowing any other process to access the data file while Quicken is open.
    Quicken user since 1997
    Premier on Windows 10
  • ps56kps56k SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 15
    As mentioned above by @splasher ....
    you really should have the DATE added to the backup filename,
    so you can keep several versions -
    and not keep overwriting the same single backup.
    Also - you need to have some of these backups off of your local hard drive.
    You can do it a couple different ways... your choice for the logistics.
    - Write directly to another device via these manual Quicken Backups
    - Write to another local folder.... and then later copy the entire folder...


    Quicken 2020 Deluxe - Subscription - Windows 10
  • SherlockSherlock SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 15
    My backup strategy is a bit different.  I save both automatic and frequent manual Quicken backups.  I rarely include a date on a manual backup but I do save the file to a different local folder.   The automatic and manual backup folders are backed up using Windows File History to an external drive hourly for 3 months.  The manual backup folder is also included in set of folders that are securely backed up to a cloud drive daily for 3 months, weekly for an additional 3 months, monthly for an additional 6 months, and annually for an additional 6 years.
    Quicken user since 1997
    Premier on Windows 10
  • TJ102TJ102 Member ✭✭✭✭
    I keep several backups in 4 different places for manual backups, I use the round robin method, so I also use the date and time so I go back and find the latest, as sometimes I may update 3 or 4 times a day depending. Your routine Sherlock IS strategic, and probably the best. Hope others can read and learn from all this too ..Thanks Guys!
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