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Another TSP Question - How to I add shares owned to QW?

TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
How does one enter the number of shares owned in the various Funds (C, S, I, L-2030, etc.) in QD R25.21 Build 27.1.25.21? I've created the Security for the C-Fund, downloaded the data from at least this last quarter, and now have no knowledge as to how to add shares that TSP.Gov says that I own. How do I manually enter this information? (Better yet, is there a How To on TSP in Quicken, from adding the Security, setting its Type, Asset Class, etc.?) Can ya hep a brutha out?
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Answers

  • jrfarisjrfaris Member ✭✭✭
    You might try an "Adjust Share Balance" transaction to set the reported share balance for each Fund for the date you want to start tracking in Quicken.
    I've tracked my Thrift Savings Plan account in Quicken for about 25 years using just the basic investment functions. As far as I know, TSP is pretty much do-it-yourself as far as Quicken goes. I haven't found a way automate transaction input so far.

    When you talk about downloading data, do you mean just the statement or transaction data? When I do that, I need manually enter the reported number of shares & total transaction value, letting Quicken calculate the per share value on that date.
    Quicken user since 1995
    Win10 Premier Subscription thru 2020
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    jrfaris said:
    You might try an "Adjust Share Balance" transaction to set the reported share balance for each Fund for the date you want to start tracking in Quicken.
    I've tracked my Thrift Savings Plan account in Quicken for about 25 years using just the basic investment functions. As far as I know, TSP is pretty much do-it-yourself as far as Quicken goes. I haven't found a way automate transaction input so far.

    When you talk about downloading data, do you mean just the statement or transaction data? When I do that, I need manually enter the reported number of shares & total transaction value, letting Quicken calculate the per share value on that date.

    Where do I try the "Adjust Share Balance" transaction? Do I have to set up a 401k account or something?

    All that I've done so far is to establish a Security account and imported the .CSV data from the TSP website for each fund since their inception date. Is that where I "Adjust Share Balance", and if so, how? I don't see that button / function.
  • jrfarisjrfaris Member ✭✭✭
    My TSP is set up as an investment/retirement account and the various funds are individual securities in the account. The Adjust Share Balance is a transaction option similar to Buy or Sell but without an associated cost. It is useful for setting the share balance to match the reported number of shares on a specific date. Then all subsequent transactions can track from that number by entering the number of shares and total value of the transaction.

    When I started TSP, there was only G Fund and it had a fixed share value of $1. I have several funds now but have never bothered with an Asset Class or Type.
    Quicken user since 1995
    Win10 Premier Subscription thru 2020
  • NotACPANotACPA SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    The initial transaction into any investment account MIGHT be an "Add Shares".  This will allow you to set the cost basis for the securities ... which "Adjust Share Balance" won't do.
    OR, if you're showing cash in the account (which doesn't seem to be the case here) it would be BUY transactions.
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription,  Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    NotACPA said:
    The initial transaction into any investment account MIGHT be an "Add Shares".  This will allow you to set the cost basis for the securities ... which "Adjust Share Balance" won't do.
    OR, if you're showing cash in the account (which doesn't seem to be the case here) it would be BUY transactions.

    Well, I fumbled around to the point that I think I'm just going to give up. I still can't figure out where you are Buying or Adding shares. My question above about starting a 401k wasn't answered so I didn't go that route, which perhaps I should have. I dunno. Thanks for playing anyway. Another subject over my head I suppose.
  • NotACPANotACPA SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 19
    You need to do INVESTING, Security List, Add Security for each security that you hold in the 401k
    THEN, go into that 401k Account and click ENTER TRANSACTION, Add - Shares Added for each security.
    It's really quite simple
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription,  Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    NotACPA said:
    You need to do INVESTING, Security List, Add Security for each security that you hold in the 401k
    THEN, go into that 401k Account and click ENTER TRANSACTION, Add - Shares Added for each security.
    It's really quite simple

    I did the first part by following 12 year old instructions on a website, so I wasn't sure if it was complete. The second part is something that hasn't been done yet... no account created. Does it matter how it gets created?

  • Jim_HarmanJim_Harman SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    @TXShooter

    Have you created an investing account to hold the securities?

    It sounds like that may be the step you are missing. Go to Tools > Add Account ... and pick the appropriate type of account under Investing & Retirement and follow the instructions there. That account is where you will be adding the securities. 
    -- Jim QWin Premier subscription
  • NotACPANotACPA SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    TOOLS,  Account  List,  Add account.
    That can be done before, or after, the additions to the Security List.
    And, it's only the "Enter Transaction" step that actually adds the holdings to your Q file
    Q user since DOS version 5
    Now running Quicken Windows Subscription,  Home & Business
    Retired "Certified Information Systems Auditor" & Bank Audit VP
  • jrfarisjrfaris Member ✭✭✭
    > @jrfaris said:
    > My TSP is set up as an investment/retirement account and the various funds are individual securities in the account.

    This short video explains adding transactions to an account once it is set up.
    Quicken user since 1995
    Win10 Premier Subscription thru 2020
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    @TXShooter

    Have you created an investing account to hold the securities?

    It sounds like that may be the step you are missing. Go to Tools > Add Account ... and pick the appropriate type of account under Investing & Retirement and follow the instructions there. That account is where you will be adding the securities. 

    Which type of account is the appropriate account under Investing & Retirement for TSP? Y'all are making some big assumptions on me, but I still appreciate the help.
  • jrfarisjrfaris Member ✭✭✭
    I would use a Brokerage account since you have multiple funds in TSP. Then the advanced setup since TSP does not support transaction download. You will need to enter transactions manually.
    Quicken user since 1995
    Win10 Premier Subscription thru 2020
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    jrfaris said:
    I would use a Brokerage account since you have multiple funds in TSP. Then the advanced setup since TSP does not support transaction download. You will need to enter transactions manually.

    In the Brokerage setup, do I leave the Cash and Money Market blank? And on the next screen, do I enter the Fund Symbols that I created in the Securities ("TSPCFund", "TSPSFund", "TSPL2030", "TSPL2050"), or put something else in those slots?
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    So I just went ahead and left those entries blank, didn't add any shares in the Creation Dialog box, and just created the Brokerage account without anything in it. Next I clicked Enter Transactions | Adjust Share Balance, and selected the Security that I created before, entered the number of shares, and did that for each of the Funds.

    Two things:
    1) The view seems ... odd, like it's broken or something.
    2) These are Placeholders? Is that what they are supposed to be, and can you explain what they are if 'yes'?
  • jrfarisjrfaris Member ✭✭✭
    I believe the answer is yes to both. It's been a long time since I set up my TSP. If you don't add all the funds now, you can do so later.
    If you are new to TSP then the starting share balance for each fund would be zero and you would manually enter each transaction from your first quarterly statement. If you have a lot past contributions, you could simply add or adjust shares to reflect the account status at the start of the latest statement and then simply track current and future transactions.
    Quicken user since 1995
    Win10 Premier Subscription thru 2020
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    jrfaris said:
    I believe the answer is yes to both. It's been a long time since I set up my TSP. If you don't add all the funds now, you can do so later.
    If you are new to TSP then the starting share balance for each fund would be zero and you would manually enter each transaction from your first quarterly statement. If you have a lot past contributions, you could simply add or adjust shares to reflect the account status at the start of the latest statement and then simply track current and future transactions.

    I've only been in this for right at two years. If I enter each transaction off of the quarterly statement, will it track and let me see the gain / losses each quarter like in the statement?
  • Jim_HarmanJim_Harman SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    If you track the contributions to the account as deductions from your paycheck and transfers to the TSP account, you should enter the securities purchased using Bought transactions. Normally you would do this with Quicken's Paycheck Wizard.

    If you are just recording the net amount of your paycheck, you should enter the securities as Added. In either case, if you enter the cost and purchase dates correctly, Quicken will be able to track the performance of your investments.
    -- Jim QWin Premier subscription
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    If you track the contributions to the account as deductions from your paycheck and transfers to the TSP account, you should enter the securities purchased using Bought transactions. Normally you would do this with Quicken's Paycheck Wizard.

    If you are just recording the net amount of your paycheck, you should enter the securities as Added. In either case, if you enter the cost and purchase dates correctly, Quicken will be able to track the performance of your investments.

    Jim,
    As far as I know you can't directly purchase shares in a TSP... a robot does that out of the percentage of your contribution. Correct me if I'm wrong... I'd love to learn more about how this works.


  • Jim_HarmanJim_Harman SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    You can't purchase the shares, but they are purchased for you by the "robot" using the cash that is deposited in your account. The cash is deducted from your paycheck and there is probably also a match from your agency or whatever. See this explanation of your statements
    https://www.tsp.gov/PDF/formspubs/tsplf13.pdf
    -- Jim QWin Premier subscription
  • jrfarisjrfaris Member ✭✭✭
    > @TXShooter said:
    > Two things:
    > 1) The view seems ... odd, like it's broken or something.
    > 2) These are Placeholders? Is that what they are supposed to be, and can you explain what they are if 'yes'?

    These are the share balances when you start tracking in Quicken and will be added to or subtracted from by each transaction you enter.

    After you have a few transactions input, it can display gain or loss for the period of time covered. Clicking the Holdings button will display the total account balance on a given date you can select. To reconcile, I usually set Holdings to the statement date and verify that the share balance in each fund is accurate. You can also manually enter the share value for that date in the Holdings view and verify that the total values match.
    Quicken user since 1995
    Win10 Premier Subscription thru 2020
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    You can't purchase the shares, but they are purchased for you by the "robot" using the cash that is deposited in your account. The cash is deducted from your paycheck and there is probably also a match from your agency or whatever. See this explanation of your statements
    https://www.tsp.gov/PDF/formspubs/tsplf13.pdf


    Jim,
    Due to the way Quicken does a few things, I've opted to just split my paycheck deposit in order to keep track of several different things (vacation and sick days earned and taken, for example). I've been keeping track of my contributions from day one into a cash account. Is it possible to go back and line these up with my TSP Securities?
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    Does this look right?
  • Jim_HarmanJim_Harman SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    To help understand what is going on, make sure Placeholders are not hidden - go to Edit > Preferences > Investment transactions and make sure "Show hidden transactions" is checked.
    -- Jim QWin Premier subscription
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    To help understand what is going on, make sure Placeholders are not hidden - go to Edit > Preferences > Investment transactions and make sure "Show hidden transactions" is checked.

    Jim,
    Did you see the photo that I posted?

  • Jim_HarmanJim_Harman SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    Sorry, yes, those are placeholders. They force your share balance to be correct but do not account for the cost of the shares. To "Resolve" a placeholder (see Help) you must go back and enter the missing transaction(s), either Added or Bought, that got those shares into your account. 

    Placeholders are a quick and dirty way to get your share balances to match your statements, but  most of us hate them because they prevent Quicken's performance tracking from working. 

    If you want to track your performance, then to record new shares you should click on Enter Transactions and pick Buy if you are tracking the cash in the account or Add if not. In either case you should enter the cost of the shares purchased from your statement.

    It sounds like you are tracking the cash. In your split paycheck transaction, you should be transferring the contributions to the TSP account. Then that money will be used to purchase the investments.
    -- Jim QWin Premier subscription
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    @Jim_Harman, @jrfaris, @NotACPA,
    I'm still learning, and I have a few more questions.
    1) In looking at the attached photo, have I entered the first statement's contributions correctly into Q?
    2) The Totals don't align with each other, and neither do the Gain/Losses. What am I doing wrong there, or how do I correct for it? How do I reconcile these transactions against the Statement?
    3) In both Quicken (and the Statement), how does the Quote/Price (Ending Balance) add up for the Total Share Price? They don't appear to be an average since the two different figures are higher than the share price entries.
    4) I am splitting my paycheck deposit, and in the past I've been transferring mine and my company's contribution into a cash account in Q. Moving forward, what should I be doing with the contributions? Does transferring them into this new Brokerage Account put monies aside that I will use to actually 'buy' shares with when the weekly TSP account updates?

    5) TSP changed how they're doing the 4th quarter statements by rolling it into the Annual Statement. However, they failed (miserably) to include each pay period's contributions in my statement, an oversight that I strongly chastised the poor agent on the phone for yesterday. How would you suggest I enter these points? Take an average of the before/after quarterly purchases and apply them equally for each of the (7?) missing periods?

    Is that too many questions all at once?

    I thank you for your patience in teaching me this.

  • Jim_HarmanJim_Harman SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    1) Yes, it looks like you entered those contributions correctly.

    2) The Market Value in the account overview is as of 4/21/2020, with a share price of 31.778164, but the ending balance on your statement presumably has a different share price.  You need to make sure Quicken has the correct share price as of the statement ending date and then set the As of date for the account overview to that date for the account balances to match.

    3) Make sure you are using consistent terms. In Quicken, "Quote/price" * "Shares" = "Market Value" 

    4) You should transfer the cash contributions into the TSP investing account and use Buy rather then Added transactions to purchase the securities. If you enter the numbers correctly, the cash should be zero at the end of the period. Note that there may be a delay between the time the cash is deducted from your paycheck and the shares are purchased. You will see the cash in your TSP investing account during that time.

    5) You may be able to get the details of the purchases from the TSP website, or you can enter one big transaction at the end of the quarter, using the total shares purchased and the total of your contributions. Let Quicken compute the price per share, which will be the average price you paid.  

    -- Jim QWin Premier subscription
  • jrfarisjrfaris Member ✭✭✭
    Jim's answers are good but I'll try to clarify a bit:
    2) on the Account Overview (Holdings Button) you can see the little clock by the Quote/Price. That means the number is estimated for the date shown. To balance, you need to set the As Of: date to the statement date (probably 6/30/18 in this case) and if the price is still estimated, enter the correct price from your statement ending balance (31.1841 in this case) Then if all the transactions covered by the statement were entered correctly, the shares and market value should balance to the statement ending balance.

    4&5) Paycheck contribution spits can be categorized as transfers into the TSP account. If so, they will show as a cash balance there. Then as Jim says, the funds should be converted to shares with a buy transaction on the same date. I don't use a CSV download, I simply enter the transaction manually by inputing the date, fund, number of shares and total value; letting Quicken calculate share price. This can either be done quarterly when you get the statement or you can get the info from the TSP web site transaction page, anytime after the pay date. So you end up with one (or more if you track employer matching) XIN (cash in) transactions as well as a Bought (Buy) for each fund on every payday.
    Quicken user since 1995
    Win10 Premier Subscription thru 2020
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    I've entered all of the transactions from my statements, using the "Bought" for each one, double-checked every entry through the whole account, and now am coming up with Cash Balance of -$0.56. Back Feb 2, 2020, there were a bunch of small transactions in the 1st Quarter 2020 statement... the ones below a dollar total 56 cents. Is it normal to have a difference like this?
  • TXShooterTXShooter Member ✭✭✭
    New question regarding 401(k) account: I had a 401(k) with my previous employer (paycheck wizard transferred my contribution to the Q account, but I didn't have it set up to transfer the employer's contribution). This company did not send out a statement with transactions, just a summary. They do (even now) have a WebConnect, which I linked (yesterday). It downloaded just a summary Place Holder. They also have a downloadable spreadsheet with each transaction. I manually entered those into this Q account (Bought), and each entry automatically created a secondary XIN transaction (Balancing Cash Adjustment). Is that normal?
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