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E*Trade not showing RSUs and ESPP values

T-Fed
T-Fed Member ✭✭
I am using the latest version of Quicken for Windows Home & Business subscription. I added my E*Trade account and it only seemed to pull in my accounts on there with some remaining cash value (not sure what these accounts are called). In other products, it will show all of my RSUs and ESPP values, including the daily changes, etc.

Am I doing something wrong or is this level of insight not possible in Quicken for Windows? (BTW, [Removed - Solication] shows me all of this detail perfectly fine).

Best Answer

  • Chris_QPW
    Chris_QPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    Accepted Answer
    Quicken gets all investment data using the OFX protocol.  As in Quicken connects to the financial institution's OFX server and gets what it sends.  What is provided is determined by the financial institution.

    Other service most likely use "aggregation" of some kind.  Which is more like talking to a server that then talks to the financial institution's website based on some "agreement" of how to get the information.

    Express Web Connect works like this second connection method (Intuit provides the aggregation), but it is only for non investment accounts.  In fact E*Trade Bank uses it.
    But it is also much less reliable than the OFX protocol since that protocol is standardized and doesn't change just because the financial institution makes some change to their website that affects the data they send to an aggregator.
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Answers

  • Sherlock
    Sherlock SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 10
    In my experience, E*Trade does not provide their Stock Plan holdings to Quicken.  I suggest you maintain these holdings manually.
  • T-Fed
    T-Fed Member ✭✭
    If that truly is the answer, that seems super lame to me (not your answer, but Quicken's inability to get that data). I noticed you said "E*Trade" is the one not providing it to Quicken, but why are many free financial tools able to get this data accurately just by giving it my account info?

    Again, no offense to you @Sherlock, and I appreciate you trying to answer it, but if I am paying $100+/year for this software I expect it to be able to do what free tools can do. I was going to mention that I thought Quicken bought Mint, but I guess it was actually Intuit and that Quicken split out of Intuit?? Not sure if I have those facts straight, but I was originally thinking they should be able to leverage similar tech/connectivity if it's "all in the family".
  • Sherlock
    Sherlock SuperUser ✭✭✭✭✭
    T-Fed said:
    If that truly is the answer, that seems super lame to me (not your answer, but Quicken's inability to get that data). I noticed you said "E*Trade" is the one not providing it to Quicken, but why are many free financial tools able to get this data accurately just by giving it my account info?

    Again, no offense to you @Sherlock, and I appreciate you trying to answer it, but if I am paying $100+/year for this software I expect it to be able to do what free tools can do. I was going to mention that I thought Quicken bought Mint, but I guess it was actually Intuit and that Quicken split out of Intuit?? Not sure if I have those facts straight, but I was originally thinking they should be able to leverage similar tech/connectivity if it's "all in the family".
    Intuit did purchase Mint and did sell Quicken.

    The arrangements financial institutions establish with the personal finance service providers vary.  If you think Mint is a better product for your needs, you should use Mint.
  • Chris_QPW
    Chris_QPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    Accepted Answer
    Quicken gets all investment data using the OFX protocol.  As in Quicken connects to the financial institution's OFX server and gets what it sends.  What is provided is determined by the financial institution.

    Other service most likely use "aggregation" of some kind.  Which is more like talking to a server that then talks to the financial institution's website based on some "agreement" of how to get the information.

    Express Web Connect works like this second connection method (Intuit provides the aggregation), but it is only for non investment accounts.  In fact E*Trade Bank uses it.
    But it is also much less reliable than the OFX protocol since that protocol is standardized and doesn't change just because the financial institution makes some change to their website that affects the data they send to an aggregator.
    Signature:
    (I'm always using the latest Quicken Windows Premier subscription version)
    This is my website: http://www.quicknperlwiz.com/
  • T-Fed
    T-Fed Member ✭✭
    > @Chris_QPW said:
    > Quicken gets all investment data using the OFX protocol.  As in Quicken connects to the financial institution's OFX server and gets what it sends.  What is provided is determined by the financial institution.
    >
    > Other service most likely use "aggregation" of some kind.  Which is more like talking to a server that then talks to the financial institution's website based on some "agreement" of how to get the information.
    >
    > Express Web Connect works like this second connection method (Intuit provides the aggregation), but it is only for non investment accounts.  In fact E*Trade Bank uses it.
    > But it is also much less reliable than the OFX protocol since that protocol is standardized and doesn't change just because the financial institution makes some change to their website that affects the data they send to an aggregator.

    Thanks for the additional details. This was helpful.
  • T-Fed
    T-Fed Member ✭✭
    edited March 23
    >Sherlock said:

    > Intuit did purchase [Removed - Solication] and did sell Quicken.

    >

    > The arrangements financial institutions establish with the personal finance service providers vary.  If you think [Removed - Solication]is a better product for your needs, you should use [Removed - Solication].


    I have to believe you didn't mean this to come off as defensive, but it kind of does. The reality is that there are many things about [Removed - Solication] that I could do without. However, coming from a software vendor myself, I believe the best software comes from constantly pushing oneself and seeing how competitors do certain things better than you. I would hope we all look at things in this manner because there is always room for improvement.


    BTW, [Removed - Solication] is only one such tool that is able to access more of my E*Trade data. [Removed - Solication] and others are also able to do it.


    Chris_QPW points out pieces of the puzzle that I didn't understand, so that was helpful to know. It would be great if Quicken was able to offer this other level of access, even if it is less "accurate" as a choice to users. For my needs, I am more interested in understanding those investments from a net-worth perspective and its fluctuations.


    I guess I will just have to use multiple tools to meet my needs (sadly).
  • Chris_QPW
    Chris_QPW Member ✭✭✭✭
    Way back when I had ESPPs I just manually entered them with the Bought/Sold ESPP sold actions in Quicken and it wasn't hard at all.  After all by definition you are dealing with only one security. RSUs are a different story since there isn't any support for them.
    Signature:
    (I'm always using the latest Quicken Windows Premier subscription version)
    This is my website: http://www.quicknperlwiz.com/
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