How do you all backup Quicken MAC ?

marpa1
marpa1 Member
Do you pay for something like Carbonite? Is there a less expensive way? :)

Answers

  • Boatnmaniac
    Boatnmaniac SuperUser ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 9
    There are many different ways people backup their Quicken data files. 
    Some back up only to their hard drive but that is taking some risk because hard drives sometimes do fail.
    Others back up to a thumb drive, CD-RW, DVD-/+RW or an external hard drive.
    Others back up to a cloud storage service.
    I do a bit of each of these: 
    • Back up to my hard drive every time I close Quicken.  I have my backup preferences set to save the last 30 backup files...which has come in handy on numerous occasions over the years. 
    • Once a week I back up all my data files (for everything) to a thumb drive.
    • Once a month or so I back up my latest backup file to a cloud storage service (I get Fidsafe free because of my relationship with Fidelity).
    If you want to use cloud storage you might want to check out Dropbox.  You can get a free code for 5 GB of storage from Quicken (as long as you don't have a Starter subscription).  Log into your Quicken.com account to get the code.  You can read more about the Dropbox offer at https://www.quicken.com/support/mac/dropbox-frequently-asked-questions.
    (QW Premier Subscription: R36.23 on Windows 10)
  • jacobs
    jacobs SuperUser, Mac Beta Beta
    1) You should set Quicken's number of backup files to a higher number than th default of 5, as was mentioned above

    2) For Mac users, the easiest backup solution is to use the Mac's built in Time Machine software to continuously back up your Mac. All you need is an external hard drive; if you don't have one lying around, you can get a quite large one for $100 or less. Spend the money; it's worth having all your data -- Quicken as well as music, photos, email and other files on your Mac -- backup up. Time Machine simply require you to turn it on once; it does everything after that automatically. 

    3) I believe having an off-site backup is a good additional layer of protection. In the event a fire, flood or other disaster hits your home, your Time Machine drive might also be ruined, so having an off-site backup is desirable protection. I use iDrive, but Backblaze and other online backup services can all fill this need. Another option is doing a periodic full-disk backup using software file Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper, sn dtsakwn this'd backup drive to somewhere other than your home for safekeeping. 
    Quicken Mac Subscription • Quicken user since 1993